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  1. #1

    Video Quality And It's Projection Related

    Hi Guys
    A question has disturbed me a lot, that is, if an APSC sensor MILC (Mirror-less Interchangeable Lens Camera) records a full hd movie (that is 1920x1080@24fps). What will be the visibility on a full size 30Ft projection screen. As it is a common known fact that 2k movie is called theatrical quality, which is just 68 pixels less in width. Rest is identical. So the question arises that a full hd movie, if projected on 30 ft screen what will be the look and feel on a scale of 1-10.
    Thanks And Regards In Advance,
    R K Ravi.

    PS:If some body have done a real projection experiment of this kind then please guide me with your perfect suggestion.

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I can't give it a rating because I don't have experience with MILC cameras and in any case there are many other factors that come into play, not just the camera and resolution. For example, the gain and general quality of the screen will make a big difference.

    I'd say two things:

    (1) The resolution and picture quality is likely to be perfectly acceptable to any audience.
    (2) What else are you going to do? Unless you have deep pockets it's unlikely you'll be shooting in anything higher than 1080p (at least for the next few years). If you want to make it happen it's probably 1080 or nothing (for now).
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
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    Quote: Dave
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    I can't give it a rating because I don't have experience with MILC cameras and in any case there are many other factors that come into play, not just the camera and resolution. For example, the gain and general quality of the screen will make a big difference.

    I'd say two things:

    (1) The resolution and picture quality is likely to be perfectly acceptable to any audience.
    (2) What else are you going to do? Unless you have deep pockets it's unlikely you'll be shooting in anything higher than 1080p (at least for the next few years). If you want to make it happen it's probably 1080 or nothing (for now).
    Great help Dave,
    Accept my regards.
    With a request of new confusion arisen. That is gain. How would I be sure that a video is having the proper gain (or measure the gain) to be able for a common theater screen. Now a days in market lots full HD video recorder options are available. But never I seen a specification as gain. So what is it? Whether it could be tuned in post production as may be required.

    My Requirement is like making 5-10 short films based on jokes of duration say 5 to 10 minutes for practice. And develop my own story as no budget feature film (Indie film). May be for festivals or if luck supports will try some regional release.

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    EDIT: After composing this message I've just realised that it was me who first mentioned the word "gain" in my message above, and that's where the confusion came from. To clarify, I was referring to the gain of the screen, not the video. That said, here's my answer:

    The word "gain" has slightly different implications in different situations. Cinema screens have their own gain, which means the proportion of light they reflect. Higher gain is generally better.

    Video can also have gain but this refers to electronic amplification of the recorded video. This is typically used when there isn't enough light for the camera to be exposed correctly so you "artificially" boost the level of the video until it looks acceptable. Unfortunately it has the side-effect of introducing noise which degrades the image. Unless you're going for a particular effect, in this case higher gain is worse. Ideally you should avoid gain altogether in video production (unless you want that effect).

    I suspect that what you're really asking about is the video level. This can be a bit confusing, especially since the move from analog to digital. In the analog days video was represented by voltage and measured in "IRE" (Institute of Radio Engineers) units. Technically that's not the case any more but we still tend to use the same system to measure video levels, i.e. a waveform monitor.

    So my advice would be to start using a waveform monitor and vectorscope if you're not already. The whitest parts of the image should be peaking around (or just under) 100 IRE. I've attached a screenshot from Adobe Premiere Pro of a waveform monitor and vectorscope. We also have some examples of how different test patterns appear on a waveform monitor (they're rather old but still valid). I'm actually hoping to do some more work on waveforms over the next few months and even develop a simple training game, but that's another story.

    In summary, it's quite a big topic and if you're not already familiar with waveform monitors it will take a while to learn all about them, but it's worth the effort.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  5. #5
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    Quote: Dave
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    EDIT: After composing this message I've just realised that it was me who first mentioned the word "gain" in my message above, and that's where the confusion came from. To clarify, I was referring to the gain of the screen, not the video. That said, here's my answer:

    The word "gain" has slightly different implications in different situations. Cinema screens have their own gain, which means the proportion of light they reflect. Higher gain is generally better.

    Video can also have gain but this refers to electronic amplification of the recorded video. This is typically used when there isn't enough light for the camera to be exposed correctly so you "artificially" boost the level of the video until it looks acceptable. Unfortunately it has the side-effect of introducing noise which degrades the image. Unless you're going for a particular effect, in this case higher gain is worse. Ideally you should avoid gain altogether in video production (unless you want that effect).

    I suspect that what you're really asking about is the video level. This can be a bit confusing, especially since the move from analog to digital. In the analog days video was represented by voltage and measured in "IRE" (Institute of Radio Engineers) units. Technically that's not the case any more but we still tend to use the same system to measure video levels, i.e. a waveform monitor.

    So my advice would be to start using a waveform monitor and vectorscope if you're not already. The whitest parts of the image should be peaking around (or just under) 100 IRE. I've attached a screenshot from Adobe Premiere Pro of a waveform monitor and vectorscope. We also have some examples of how different test patterns appear on a waveform monitor (they're rather old but still valid). I'm actually hoping to do some more work on waveforms over the next few months and even develop a simple training game, but that's another story.

    In summary, it's quite a big topic and if you're not already familiar with waveform monitors it will take a while to learn all about them, but it's worth the effort.
    Hey Dave!!!
    Really feeling obligated by your sincere reply. would you be my GODFATHER for... (I mean, if I make it my success story)
    Any way I just can't stop myself giving you credit of whatever I'm going to make in course of my success. Because that much help you did already. If I deserve give me your contact no, if u don't bother SMS.
    I'll bother if it's yours even if it's a miss call. 00918647847499.

  6. #6
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Thanks very much for the nice reply. Honestly it's no problem though - this is what I do. I'm very happy to help.

    Unfortunately I do have a policy of not giving out my phone number or contacting people by phone. It's nothing personal, just a policy that I've found is best for me after doing this for quite a few years.

    If you'd like to do something nice for us we have a few suggestions on this page:
    http://www.mediacollege.com/home/support.html

    And of course I'm always happy to be given credit
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

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