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  1. #1
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    Hi, some much needed advice wanted please

    Hi, I came to this website via google and landed on a page which gives advice into getting into TV production career.

    Some of the advice was very helpful, but im still as what to do to get myself my dream job.

    For the past two years ive been wanting to get into media, and after watching some ITV recordings as an audience member, it became more apparent that this is the job I wanted to do. It's some fascinating stuff watching the buzz behinds the camera's.

    I am 26 with no real school qualifications, and only a short period of time have I worked over the past 10 years, as I have three children (been supported by my husband). I am now at the point in my life where I want a career rather than just any old job.

    So my question is, where do I start. My CV gives no employer any reason to hire me, as not only do I not have any experience in the media, I dont have much work experience at all, a few years waitressing, my school work experience at HSBC as a runner for 3 weeks and working in my mum's shop for a year.
    What qualifications do I need, and what courses can I do to help secure myself a job in television?
    I'm willing to start right down at the bottom as a runner and work my way up.

    Any advice at all would be very much appreciated.

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: maddy860
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    Hi, I came to this website via google and landed on a page which gives advice into getting into TV production career.

    Some of the advice was very helpful, but im still as what to do to get myself my dream job.

    For the past two years ive been wanting to get into media, and after watching some ITV recordings as an audience member, it became more apparent that this is the job I wanted to do. It's some fascinating stuff watching the buzz behinds the camera's.

    I am 26 with no real school qualifications, and only a short period of time have I worked over the past 10 years, as I have three children (been supported by my husband). I am now at the point in my life where I want a career rather than just any old job.

    So my question is, where do I start. My CV gives no employer any reason to hire me, as not only do I not have any experience in the media, I dont have much work experience at all, a few years waitressing, my school work experience at HSBC as a runner for 3 weeks and working in my mum's shop for a year.
    What qualifications do I need, and what courses can I do to help secure myself a job in television?
    I'm willing to start right down at the bottom as a runner and work my way up.

    Any advice at all would be very much appreciated.

    Thank you
    Hello Maddy860,
    I don't know exactly how much advice I could dispense due to the lack of experience in GB workforce. Naturally a degree or vocational school certification would help the most but you would have to do a lot of soul searching. You have to be honest (to yourself most of all) what your strong and weak points are, to use as a compass for a career that you could easily succeed in. We all have dreams, which I think is totally natural, but if you explore in areas you've never dabbled in, you may realize how good or terrible you may be. You won't know until you've done it or gone through it.

    For example, I had a hard time deciding which college major to pursue. Having taken courses in drafting in high school, I thought I could/should try out architecture. But it was my first year when I realize, that I was not a creative person but can easily copy and adapt.

    Having spent about 3 years in b&w photography, I decided to pursue video and filmmaking. This previous background gave me an edge that most of the students lacked with the exception of some art students with a similar background. Being academically challenged but the ability to copy, perfect, repeat got me through other situations. I'm not a prodigy at all, but I think it was my time spent in the b&w darkroom, to go thru a process of 'one step at a time' correction to get a better picture.

    I was never really strong in math but I still became a Broadcast Engineer eventually. I actually specialized before I completed my college studies. The outside variables of this was to be at the right place at the right time and to fill a need.

    You may need to look into some resume building so that you can explain your strong points and know where to strengthen your weak side.

    Regards,
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #3
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Hi Maddy860,

    You've already seen most of my advice in the article you read so I'm not sure if I can offer much more, but anyway...

    It's true that your lack of qualifications and experience will make it more difficult for you to get a job, but by no means impossible. I've hired people in similar positions before. As an employer I was interested in attributes such as enthusiasm, initiative, interpersonal skills, etc. Of course I'm not going to hire an unskilled person for a skilled position so I'd only hire such a person for an entry-level position, but that's fine if you're willing to work your way up.

    Are you able to take a course? i.e. do you have the time and money required to undertake some relevant education? If so, that's probably a good idea. You've got a much better chance of being taken seriously if you can show that you've completed some sort of introductory media qualification. I don't know what's available in your area but if you have a local educational institute that has media courses I'd be happy to look at their website and make some recommendations.

    If a formal course isn't an option, another very good choice would be to do some unpaid work at a TV channel or video production house. Do you have anything like this in your area? Community TV is a great place to get started as they're used to dealing with complete n00bs like yourself, and they'll probably be happy to give you training in return for your labour.

    If you're still stuck, it's worth contacting some TV channels or video producers and asking if you can get unpaid work experience with them. The value of doing this sort of work is highly variable. In some cases you'll get excellent training opportunities and make contacts that give you the start you need. In other cases you'll be used as disposable labour and given nothing in return. That's the gamble you take.

    I think a good next step would be to put together a list of possibilities in your area - educational institutes, community or student TV channels, major TV channels, film & video production houses. It's also worth looking at other media such as radio stations, as even experience in these areas can show that you're not useless. If you like, post that list here and we can have a look to see which ones look the most promising.

    In the meantime, do you have a video camera? There's a lot of stuff you can do yourself to get started. Read through our video production tutorials and start to learn the basics. It will be a huge help if you make yourself familiar with things like the basic shot types. Read, practice, ask questions in our forum, and do as much as you can to get some sort of head start. As well as helping to get some basic skills and understanding, it will also show a potential employer that you are self-motivated and have initiative.

    One last comment - as in many professions, your interpersonal skills are very important. To put it bluntly, likeable people who mix well in social situations do better than unpopular people. This is a delicate topic that doesn't usually get discussed for fear of causing offence, but I think it's really important. I've seen many competent people's careers fail because they rubbed their colleagues up the wrong way. I've also seen competent people stagnate because they were too shy to put themselves forward. There's a fine balance to be achieved - being outgoing enough to get noticed without being annoyingly self-promoting. Anyway, that's just some food for thought.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  4. #4
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: Dave
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    One last comment - as in many professions, your interpersonal skills are very important. To put it bluntly, likeable people who mix well in social situations do better than unpopular people. This is a delicate topic that doesn't usually get discussed for fear of causing offence, but I think it's really important. I've seen many competent people's careers fail because they rubbed their colleagues up the wrong way. I've also seen competent people stagnate because they were too shy to put themselves forward. There's a fine balance to be achieved - being outgoing enough to get noticed without being annoyingly self-promoting. Anyway, that's just some food for thought.
    I find this passage of Dave's very important. It is very true, especially in the early days/months of a job during an orientation period and it varies from company to company. If the culture of a company or maybe the department that you work in does not work out well, it's possible for you or the employer to release the employment agreement because of not the right fit. A person needs to be themselves plus fit in to have a good experience. There's a lot to tolerate and some compromise may need to be made but you don't necessarily need to change yourself to fit in.

    Good luck!


    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

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