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  1. #1

    wattage of amplifier

    Dear all my fellow Media college members, I was just wondering if I was to run two 500 watt speakers with 4 ohms per speaker, how powerful of an amplifier would I need to get to power these speakers fully the 500 per speaker, would it be a 1000 watt amplifer or 500 watt amplifier, I know that I need a 4 ohm ampifier cuase you match the ohms of the amplifier with the ohms of the speakers but the watts I dont know what to do to get the correctly powered with out underpowering or overloading the speakers, your assistance is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

  2. #2
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Your asking the right question. The answer must be from the amplifier. It's suppose to be written in the equipment specification - 500W per channel; 1000W per channel etc... If this is not stated then a 500W amp is 250W per channel; 1000W is 500W per channel (this is a sales gimmick for those unaware). Whatever the case is READ to be sure - sales people are not always knowledgeable and they do make mistakes, no matter how good they talk.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #3
    cool... just one last question, if I were to piggy back a 400 watt speaker into another 400 watt speaker, would I have to gain the channel on the amplifier to 800 watts or keep it at 400 watts? Thank you!

  4. #4
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    By putting 2 speakers in parallel from one amplifer channel, you will create a problem rather than create an advantage. You can blow the speakers and/or the amplifier. Even though I never designed speakers, the circuitry is nothing new. In order to create the advantage that you seek, may I suggest a bit of research in the subject of speaker design. Unfortunately, I have no book recommendations,
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  5. #5
    opps!! I sending the wrong message!! I meant piggyback one 400 watt speaker to another 400 watt speaker meaning you plug the amplifer into one of the parallel in/outs on the first speaker and then you plug the other speaker into the other parallel in/out connection, I know that the speakers that can do this say parallel inputs/ outputs, but it seems to me that these would be wired in series by connecting them in this manner... But you know what, that leads me right back to needing to research speaker design to see how exactly these parallel in/outs are wired (if they're wired in series so that is the first speaker would fail, it wouldnt send the audio onto the next speaker, or if they have them wired so that if the speaker fails and then it just passes right back though to the next speakers...) I just dont get it.. ITS SO FUSTRATING!! If any of you know how these speakers are wired, then please let me know... Thanks!! (you gotta love all my smileys that I put in here)

  6. #6
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    details on amplifier

    Can any one please tell me the basic things that one should look in while buying a power amplifier and can some one eexplain me what is bridged mono and can i convert balanced mono to stereo.

    Thanks

    ignatius

  7. #7
    AV god
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    Speakers 101

    You have to 1st worry not that it's 500 watts max a speaker, but you have to go based on the Rms value, this truly gives you the speaker output that you can consistantly use some 500 watt speakers have only a RMS rating of 150 watts depending on brand/quality and the stupidity of the marketers. Lets say the speakers you have are 500 watts RMS.

    You have 2 choices

    Choice 1 :Find a 1ch Commercial grade Power AMP with a 8ohm 500 watt RMS output and you can hook the speakers in series.
    Wiring would go like this

    1) Positive from amp to positive on speaker 1
    2) Negative From Speaker 1 to Positive on Speaker 2
    3) Negative From speaker 2 to the Negative on The Amp

    The Amp will have an 8ohm load which it works best with due to it being an 8ohm Amplifier

    Choice 2

    Buy a 2ch 4 ohm 1000w RMS (500w ch) Amplifier

    Wiring would the typical positive to positive negative to negative hope this helps

    Basic wiring principal for circuits of any type,

    (Series) you add the resistance(ohms) of each device in series 4-4 ohm speakers in series would have a 16 ohm load on that channel of the circuit(amp) THis is to much of load and you will get a low volume and poor life span out of amp and speakers

    (Parallel) 4- 4 ohm speakers in parallel would have aload rating of 1amp this is very little resistance you will burn the amp out and speakers out very easily

    If you are doing a commercial install or multiple speakers and limited channels the best bet is a series/parallel circuit to match the total load on each channel match the ohm rating on the amp

  8. #8
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote
    Quote: AV god
    Speakers 101

    You have 2 choices

    Choice 1 :Find a 1ch Commercial grade Power AMP with a 8ohm 500 watt RMS output and you can hook the speakers in series.
    Wiring would go like this

    1) Positive from amp to positive on speaker 1
    2) Negative From Speaker 1 to Positive on Speaker 2
    3) Negative From speaker 2 to the Negative on The Amp

    The Amp will have an 8ohm load which it works best with due to it being an 8ohm Amplifier
    Snip....

    Quote
    Quote: AV god
    Speakers 101
    (Series) you add the resistance(ohms) of each device in series 4-4 ohm speakers in series would have a 16 ohm load on that channel of the circuit(amp) THis is to much of load and you will get a low volume and poor life span out of amp and speakers
    Hi AV God - I'm basically in agreement with all that you've said with the exception of the quote above. In Choice 1, wouldn't the 8ohm speakers be considered in series? Rather than using 2x 8ohm, shouldn't be it be 2x 4ohm so that the amp sees it as 8ohms? Feel free to correct me if there was something I missed.

    Best Regards!
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  9. #9

    Re: series and parallel speakers

    This thread is hard to follow. Andrewr's assumption of parallel speaker jacks yielding a series connection sounds wrong. The two speakers would be series only if connected like AV god says in choice 2, in which case if either speaker fails due to an open circuit (that metalic ozone smell) the other would not work. A short, on the other hand, will load down the amp, causing it to run hot or even burn up.

    But if the jacks on the speakers are labeled Parallel then the impedence (Z) would be half that of one speaker when 2 speakers are used, 1/3 when 3 speakers are used, 1/4 for 4 speakers, etc. I suggest a book on basic electronics.

    It would also be helpful to know what the speakers and amps will be used for, i.e. home stereo, PA system, studio monitors, etc.

  10. #10

    Am I Getting This Yet?!

    ok, so if i were to connect two 8 ohm, 300 watts based on rms value speakers in parallel, the most optimal amplifier to drive these speakers would be rated for 600 watts at 4 ohm correct? Please disregard any of the above posts if they are confusing to follow and just simply tell me if this above statement is correct and if it is incorrect, please tell me what is incorrect about it and I'll see if I can pick up on it. Thank all of you and I must apoligise for the disorder, panic, and chaos of this thread, I guess that SC358's "work is done here"...

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