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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Geraldine, New Zealand
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    Normalizing, what's the deal?

    OK, I am no audio expert at all, my project is finished, do I normalize the project as one, or at the track level? Anybody know of any good tutorials on this? Any help appreciated.

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    Te Awamutu, New Zealand
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    Re: Normalizing, what's the deal?

    Normalizing is applied to a clip rather than a track. It isn't something I'd usually do unless there was a good reason - I prefer to have manual control over sound levels rather than auto-adjusting them. However it can be a very useful tool if you audio is a bit up and down.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Geraldine, New Zealand
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    8

    Re: Normalizing, what's the deal?

    Thanks Dave,
    I have 3 tracks, 1 music, 1 voice over and one original that came with the video, but with heaps of wind, sometimes with a little sometimes with alot, there are heaps of clips in the 1 hr project so I don't particularly feel like manually ducking the strong wind and not actually getting an even volume thruout.
    I'm using Vegas..............and the Wave hammer plug in looks promiseing, but I have no idea how to set it up, i.e. attack, threshold etc.........

  4. #4
    Barry
    Guest

    Re: Normalizing, what's the deal?

    Using a Noise Gate might help - A Gate is exactly what it sounds like...like a door. When a person is talking the gate opens and the sound comes through, when the person is not talking there is no sound and the gate closes. This is typically used when recording a Bass drum from a full drum kit (so you dont get any bleed through from the other drums or cymbols in that mike). Set the threshold of the gate to where you want to cut the outside noise. It takes some messing around to get it right. But as for when someone is talking and there is still nosie or hiss...maybe try a DeEsser, which takes some sibilance away. Other than that you might have to re-record the audio and sync it when editing.

  5. #5
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: Normalizing, what's the deal?

    If the peak volume of the audio is less than 95% of the dynamic range, then it's a good idea to normalize.

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