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  1. #1

    Wireless Mic + XLR Connection = NOISE

    I hope somebody may help me:

    I play an electric guitar and it is usually plugged to a RPx400 guitar processor (by Digitech). This processor has a XLR mic phantom powered input, that allow me to plug any dinamic mic and get a reverbed output and also has a line in input (with reverb effect too).

    I usually plug mi guitar and mic to the processor, and this processor to a sony audio system. Last christmas I got an UHF wireless mic with a diversity receiver. This receiver has to diferent outputs, one XLR and an aux 1/4" output. When I connect the receiver to the processor thru XLR connector I got noise (like feedback noise) thru the speakers. But when I connect the mic receiver to processor tru the 'line in' input, it works good but with not enough volume.

    I tried to connect the receiver 1/4" output ro the XLR mic input in the processor using an XLR cable and an XLR to 1/4" adapter, but now I get low volume voice and really high volume 'Pops' (explosion sound) at the speakers.

    May the phantom power in the XLR mic input at the processor, going to the XLR output at the mic receiver doing something akward? or Am I missing any simple rule about wireless and XLR?

    Thanks for any help you may provide.
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    Last edited by mao; 9th Jan 2006 at 20:40.

  2. #2
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    Re: Wireless Mic + XLR Connection = NOISE

    Hello,
    I am not a musician and know absolutely nothing about guitar processors; however, I have sorta messed around with audio receivers and sound mixers for years so I will attempt to help. Please help by listing the exact Manufacturers Name and Model Numbers of the equipment involved:
    1. The wireless microphone and receiver [Diversity name indicates that it probably is made by Shure]:

    2. Guitar processor:

    3. Sony receiver:
    The noise being emitted by your speakers indicates some interference with the signal output to them. This might be effected by the reiceiver sound process you have chosen to use. Which process are you using? Are you sure you have chosen the correct input connection?
    Back when you answer,
    Gene K

  3. #3

    woo got a few corrections and misunderstandings...

    First off, the phantom power on your xlr isnt for dynamic mics, they do not require phantom power to operate, you're thinking of condenser mics which are the better of the two and do require phantom power to operate. Second, I have learned alot while running quite a few wireless sound reinforcement systems while here in Houston, Texas. It goes liek so, you have a UHF wireless system and it just so happens that television stations boradcast their video on the UHF frequecny band (usualy here in houston which is quite populated I am quite lucky to find a frequency that does not have interference on it). So thus, this hissing that you hear is interference and to solve, jstu simply play around with the channels on your wireless system (assuming that you bought a reciever and pack that which the transmition frequency can be changed) untill you can find a frequency with less or no interference. If you have bought a static frequency range pack/reciever, then try decreasing the distance between the transmition pack and reciver and you will also notice that sometimes the audio will just simply cut out once the reciver and transmiter are moved so far apart, here I have found that at even 10 feet apart, I have had wireless systems cut out on me adn not just alittle, like alot (probably becuase I was running an outside gig ) So yeah, hope this has been able to help and do try to change the frequency (if your system permits you to do so) becuase this will most likely rectify this problem the easiest, quickest, and with better results, as well as try to decresase the distance between your transmiter and reciever and this also will aid in rectifying your problem. Hope this has helped! If not then yeah just let us know what you have tried and give us some more details about your wireless system. Also, one last note, I have witnessed cheap recievers and cheap processors to cuase this as well. Also, accoding to your diagram, the way that I would recomend running a setup like this would be definately with the XLR out and xlr in becuause I have never heard of xlr causing interference, XLR was made with 3 pins for the exact reason of interference, so simply the xlr cable functions properly, it will reduce interference, unless you have bought an extremely cheap XLR cable (when I have run cheap xlr cables over power cables and so, I have gotten lots of noise in the lines simply becuase of this), then it should cut out the noise, also, try turnign the phantom power off on your xlr connection, becuase it is not needed and that popping you hear when using the 1/4" output and then the XLR input on processor, that is becuase phantom power is not normaly run through 1/4", so that popping is a bad thing... just try those few things i mention above and if none of those work, then you have either some equipment malfunctioning or it is jsut nto the best piece of equipment. Where I bet the fault is in your equipment is your RCA cable becuase all RCA cables are very easily interfered with and if you are getting low volume, then that is porbably what is happening unless the gain/volume is down ver low somewhere on your equipment...GOOD LUCK!!
    Last edited by andrewr; 19th Jan 2006 at 05:34.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2005
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    Re: Wireless Mic + XLR Connection = NOISE

    I think you are correct about the XLR connector and wire not being the cause of any interference since all I have fooled with is fairly heavily shielded [wire wrapped]. To push interference through that shielding, in my mind, would require an abnormally strong and close signal. That diversity [very probably mfg by Shure] wireless microphone and receiver probably provide 48 volt phantom power [or less]. We need to know the make and model of all the stuff so that capabilities, processors, plugs and all can be determined on line hopefully. HAPPY 2006!!
    Gene K

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