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  1. #1
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    Movie Set Photography

    I had an opportunity recently to be a on set photographer for a movie filmed in Utah, USA. I am an avid digital photographer, but being on set around high end film camcorders brought me to a whole new level of photography. My question is this....Filming movies usually use 24 FPS (frames per second). The DP (director of photography) would say what the f/stop was in each lighting situation. So how does the 24 fps convert to shutter speed. In my next movie coming up in July, I would like to be able to hear what the DP says the f/stop is and interpret what I can put on my camera for the f/stop. Can anyone explain this conversion to me, or point me in a direction of a web site that might help. THANKS

  2. #2
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote
    Quote: dkstaker
    ...So how does the 24 fps convert to shutter speed. In my next movie coming up in July, I would like to be able to hear what the DP says the f/stop is and interpret what I can put on my camera for the f/stop. Can anyone explain this conversion to me, or point me in a direction of a web site that might help. THANKS
    24 fps does not covert to shutter speed. In regards to film, fps only has to do with how fast the film moves past the lens for exposure. During that, "one" frame of exposure, is when shutter speed comes into play. How long is that "one" frame exposed for 1/30th, 1/60th, 1/125th of a sec...etc.

    The f-stop has to do with how much light passes throught the lens. The iris or diaphragm is adjusted for that amount of light. Whether f1.9, f5.6 etc... is used, it affects both exposure and depth of field (which is another subject altogether).

    The digital world is trying to imitate the film world and it cuts off, "the craft". This craft is now being done via Photoshop and other media manipulators which is done (in post) after the shooting session. Unless you have a digital slr (single lens reflex) you can't understand 64ASA; 1/30th of a sec @ f4, because manufacturers of consumer digital cameras are just point & shoot.

    I haven't done photography in a very long time. Today's digital slr's are just way too expensive for my finances, so I'm slumming with a point & shoot. If you're really still curious and need to pursue this, you'd need to shoot with an slr and film to get a clearer picture... You can read all you want but when you apply it - it's another world.
    Last edited by SC358; 12th Jun 2006 at 12:54.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #3
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    I'm sorry, I might not have explained myself very well. I am shooting with a Digital SLR, and I do understand the f/stop and the shutterspeed and what they all do. In essence, the FPS can be is like the shutter speed, the amount of time the shutter lets the light hit the sensors, or in film the amount of time that the particular frame is exposed to the light. I would like to know what the time is. at 24 fps, is is 1/24th of a second, RIGHT? Does that translate to how fast my shutter speed should be at all? That is what I would like to know.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Ahhh - ok, sorry for the misunderstanding. In the digital world of still photography, yes 1/24th would also be set an exposure. Can you actually set that? I haven't really played with any of the dslrs. I recall on my old 35mm slr, there was 1/30th & 1/15th but nothing in between. Is it possible to set to any variable of a second or has the old way's also crossed over into the digital world?


    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  5. #5
    Douglas eisenstark
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    film speed

    If the cinematographer is using the simplist type of film camera, the shutter speed is 1/50 th of a second. However on more sophisticated cameras the shutter speed can be adjusted for reasons of motion and light. (If this is a digital camera then its a whole other ball of wax.) I'm not sure why you would need to shoot your stills at the same shutter speed as him or her but if needed then I think it would be entirely appropriate to ask.

    hope that helps

  6. #6
    24fps translates to 1/48th of a second.

  7. #7
    Hi Guys
    If you are doing stills then the frame rate of the movie cameras has no consequence at all on your pics. You can totally ignore the movie cameras, be they film or video or both.
    Simply shoot your stills with an appropriate shutter speed and aperture to get the depth of field you want. Video cameras use a 24fps as opposed to a 25fps (PAL) or 30fps (NTSC) to emulate film. That is also a seperate entity to shutter speed and aperture on the film and video camera.

    However if you want to expose exactly as the movie crew have exposed then all you need is the shutter speed and aperture but I would still tend to use the TTL exposure on your DSLR or use your own light meter.

    Chris

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