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Thread: Dans video

  1. #1
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    Dans video

    Hi all,

    I'm going to shoot sort of a dance video - not very high-tech, just an ordinary 'registration' on tape of one of my choreographies - but as I'm absolutely clueless about filming and all that, I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on how to portrait ("frame" I think is the right word) dance movements in such a way that they're clearly visible. I think it's got something to do with the 'crossing the line' bit I read in the video tutorial, but I'm not quite sure I understand what's going on... :s. Basically, to give an example, I need to know the best camera-angle to frame a 'pirouette' (a turn), so that the audience can see clearly how this turning movement is made by the dancer. Same goes for jumps, dancing in pairs... well, anything really. But please, only the basics, because as I said I'm only a beginner.

    Thanks in advance!!!

    Greetz,

    a silly clueless Belgian person ;-)

  2. #2
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Hello Greetz & welcome!

    I'm glad to see (or rather read) someone is taking on such a project. I can only pass on some history. Fred Astaire is my point of reference. I hope you can at least research what he did in his choreographs also. In his contract with the studios, all his dances were full body shot framing - never ever any close-ups. This was to show he performed everything. How simple is that? No need to zoom just follow along, of course the cameraman has to be aware of the framing as well.

    Crossing the line refers to shooting a scene in one direction and then switching 180 degrees the other way or reverse shot. For instance a 2 shot, with a male on the left side and a female on the right of screen. If the next shot is 180 degrees the other way where the male is on the right and the female is on the left side of the screen - you have crossed the line. This can cause confusion to viewer. In order to avoid that, you can shoot the couple (in a circular fashion) either towards camera left or camera right but not 180 degrees on the following shot. There should be some sort of transition so the viewer understands 'how' they got to view a reverse shot. The exception when this really works is when a couple is face to face and your doing, 'over-the -shoulder' shots.

    This is a rule and a handful of directors have broken that rule intentionally for artistic reasons.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #3
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    Thanks!!! I think I've got it now. Fortunately I managed to get hold of someone who studied something media-ish to be my camera-man, so he should know something about it... But I felt like I should at least know some basics as well, as I'm going to be the 'choreographer', so I can 'translate' my artistic views on the dancing - what I eventually want it to look like - more effectively.

    So anyway, stick your thumbs up for me, shooting starts next week How terribly EXCITING! haha.


    Many many thanks!!!


    Hele(e)n.

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