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  1. #1
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    What's the best PC laptop for making movies?

    I have Premier Pro, After Effects, Encore, Macromedia Studio, Visual Communicator Pro, Roxio DVD Copy that I couldn't afford to replace if I got a Mac, so I'm going PC again.

    I have been waiting for the dual 64-bit machines to come out, and some are out now.

    I want a portable editing studio, so I want a monster laptop, if it can take the heat.

    Some laptops out there come with 200GB+ hard drives, 2GBs of memory and dual processors above 2.0 GHz. They are smaller than the desktops, but it sounds like plenty from what I'm used to.

    Anybody tried editing broadcast quality digital movies with a muscle laptop? Can they take the heat?

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I use a Dell Inspiron 9300, 2GHz Pentium, 1GB RAM, 100GB hard drive, GeForce Go 6800 and 17" screen (1920x1200). When I bought it, it was pretty much the best I could find without being ridiculous.

    It's been great. It can capture and edit normal standard definition video in real-time with no problem. It's not quite as snappy as my 3.2GHz desktop but it's not too far off the pace.

    These days broadcast quality isn't as much challenge as it used to be. High-definition... now that's something else. My laptop can edit HD (just) but I have to capture HD footage on my desktop. If I try to capture HD on the laptop it falls apart.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
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    Thanks Dave

    Thanks Dave,

    About a month ago when I was shopping for computers at Circuit City, I met a young computer nerd working there who differed from the usual "salesmen types."

    He told me if I wanted a powerful PC laptop for video editing, I should wait a while longer for the dual 64-bit PCs to show up. He said it would be in a couple months, even before Vista came out in 2007.

    He said the dual 64-bit PCs would close the gap in stability between Macs an PCs.

    I went back to Circuit City last week and asked it the 64-bit computers were in. A "salesmen type" staff member assured me that all their computers were 64-bit models and pointed out the "Vista compatable" stickers on them to persuade me to buy one.

    I went home and did some research on the Internet, evoking doubts. I returned to Circuit City and discussed the issue with the manager of the comuputer department.

    The manager said the computer nerd told me the truth and the other guy didn't get it right. He said the "Vista compatible" models presented as 64-bit computers were really dual 32-bit models that would work with a transitional version of Vista, but weren't the real dog.

    He said they received a shipment of dual 64-bit desktops, but he had sold the last one in stock the day before. The only laptop with the new PC technology in the store was a medium powered Acer. I've done an Acer, and don't want to go there again.

    Consumer reports I reviewed credits HP with dealling best with the heat issue in muscle laptops (maybe because they are larger with more surface area). I prefer the larger screens to the more compact Toshibas and Sonys for editing. And HPs are far less pricey, which counts.

    One thing I don't understand is the description of processors on new "dual processor" computers. I use a Dell Dimension 2350 that I picked up pre-owned for five bills a year after the owner (retired senior) decided computers were not for him. It sports a whopping 30 GB hard drive, 256MB of Ram (orriginally, I bumped it up to 768), and Pentium 4,1.8GHz processor.

    I'm looking at laptop PCs with 200+ GB hard drives, 2 Gigs of Ram, that feature somewhere around 2.0GHz (dual) processors.

    Does a "dual" 2.0GHz processor mean the same as a 4.0GHz processor compared with my Dimension 1.8GHz processor that doesn't include the qualifier (dual)? I mean, all the other specs of the computers I'm looking at are 2 to 3 times that of my computer, where processor numerals look about the same.

    Do you know anything about this?

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Re the 64-bit question, I'm not completely up with the play there. My understanding has been that true 64-bit PCs and software are still a little while away, but if you can afford to wait then I guess it makes sense to go 64-bit. I'm really not sure how long it will be before software catches up though.

    The "dual-core" processor label is quite misleading, especially for those of us who have owned "dual processor" systems. In fact dual-core is not the same as dual processor so a dual-core 2GHz is not equivalent to 4GHz. Most likely you will find up to a 40% performance increase, so a dual-core 2GHz might be equivalent to around 2.8GHz.

    Whereas a dual processor system has two separate processors side by side, a dual-core processor is still just a single processor, but is effectively split in two so the processor can handle requests more efficiently.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  5. #5

    Get a Mac

    all software you need is on it (for free)
    Good luck!

    Jeroen
    Last edited by Jeroen; 13th Sep 2006 at 11:09.

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