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  1. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    2
    I have a problem regarding masking emails. In fact this feature is been used by spammers also...to mask their emails. Everyday I get hundreds of emails and the sender is MY EMAIL ACCOUNT

    I deleted them because I am thinking that if I mark them as spam maybe problems could occur, what do you think I should do best

  2. #12
    If your website is for business promotion, then I’m sure you have installed a mechanism that allows you to gather contact details from your web visitors.

    The recommended utility for this sort of thing is the ‘Contact Form’.

    However, if you have not been able to place such a form on the page, for one reason or another, I suspect you have taken the easiest option.

    What is this option?

    It is the email link. You have simply plastered your email address on the page and invited your visitor to click it to send you a message.

    If that is what you have done, then expect tons of spam emails from all over.

    Any unmasked email address on a web page is an attractive target for spam bots. These are programs that extract email addresses such as yours and sell them to spam farms.

    How Your Email Address is Harvested

    When you create your email link, here is what you put down

    <a href=”mailto:info@mydomain.com”>Contact Us</a>

    The ‘mailto:’ is designed to launch the user’s email client program, such as Outlook Express.

    In general, the email harvesters, also known as email spiders, are looking precisely for the format presented above. The email tag, ‘mailto:’ is the primary target. Then of course, every email address must have the ‘@’ symbol.

    The Common Solution

    The common solution is to mask the email address, to encode it, using javascript, for example. Unfortunately, this approach fails miserably if your web page is hosted on a shared platform like this blog platform right here.

    For security reasons, shared platforms tend to disable javascript in the interests of security.

    The Elegant Solution

    Instead of using the ‘mailto:’ tag, it uses the ‘http://’ tag.

    The ‘http://’ is designed to launch a browser window to display whatever web page is specified. The email harvester is not interested in this.

  3. #13
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    2
    Thanks amit1990, but I am not a rookie on this. All of those you have mentioned I had done them many monthss ago...and whenever I can't use my email form then I use the following -> reCAPTCHA. Which is a better solution than the http:// issue.

    Some websites had copied some articles from my site in the past and at the end they have add: "Written (or Source) by: myemail@email.bla"

    I had contact with those websites and some of them changed that particular line but some websites didn't gave a damn.

  4. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    2

    js mail masker not working in IE7?

    I have been using a different masking script for years, on my clients' sites, and now I'm told that it doesn't work in IE7. I work on a Mac, so I haven't tried it but I'm told it just doesn't do anything. The script I've been using is:

    in the head tags:

    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/JavaScript">

    <!--
    function mailer(oName,oDomain)
    {
    email="mailto:" + oName + "@" + oDomain;
    window.location=email;
    }

    </script>

    And then this in the body:

    <a href="javascript:mailer('myname','mydomain.com')">Email me</a>

    Would the scripts on these pages work in IE7? Why doesn't this one? Never mind, I don't want the details, I just want a script that works in IE7!

    thanks for any help you can offer

  5. #15
    webwmnwest - I would actually advise against that and instead use a server-side mailer so that the client can never see the email information.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  6. #16
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    2

    masking email addresses

    Do you mean creating little form links for every email address? Sounds like a pain, but I guess it is the only safe way to do it.

    Now all I have to do is talk the clients into the extra billable hours...

  7. #17
    Quote
    Quote: webwmnwest
    View Post
    Do you mean creating little form links for every email address? Sounds like a pain, but I guess it is the only safe way to do it.

    Now all I have to do is talk the clients into the extra billable hours...
    You could easily do this with one form and a drop-down to select "department" (really which email address) to contact and then interpret the department names as email addresses on your server-side handler. or, if you run your own MX on the same domain and local network as the server, you can likely set up your send mail daemon to simply send mail to username rather than username@domainname, so the internet addressable address is never seen.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  8. #18
    I noticed someone somewhere on B-G Forums mentioned that it was easy to mask your email address, I can't find that posting now but do want to know how to do it - can anyone help?
    In the past I've put up a website with my email address on it and the amount of junk mail I received increased dramatically. I don't wish that to happen again but do want my email address available in case anyone seeing the site has a connection with the family and wants to get in touch.
    I wrote something about it in this thread (http://www.british-genealogy.com/for...read.php?t=751) ("Web design", post #16). As there are a lot of posts there, I'll repeat my suggestion, which seems to work well:

    1. Don't show your email address on the page - all the link should show is "Email me" or "Contact me" or whatever is appropriate.
    2. Don't just type your email address in when you create the link, but put it in the source using ASCII code.
    3. Have just one page on the site with email addresses, with the "email me" links on other pages pointing to that. This way your email address appears only once on the site rather than dozens of times, so it's less likely to be found by crawlers.

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