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  1. #1
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    Difference in Db between Mic and Line levels

    Could anyone out there tell me the difference in db between a line level and a mic level. ie if your sending a 1khz tone to a camera on line level, the monitoring level is set to -18Db. What is it set to for 1 khz tone on a mic level feed.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

  3. #3
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    The short answer is: There's approximately 40dB difference between the two.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  4. #4
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    Quote: Dave
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    The short answer is: There's approximately 40dB difference between the two.


    ok that is is the short answer,. however they are two totally different things. dave i hope i don't get banned for stepping on your toes here.
    Db and Khz are not the same thing and are hard to compare,. seeing how different levels are different apartness (is that a word?) in order to understand, you must fully understand both. daves answer is correct dor TV applications, Movie applications are slightly different, and an application such as a concert is WAY off from that!
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

  5. #5
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    It would be a poor forum if I banned people for sharing their knowledge
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  6. #6
    It can get even deeper than that, fellas. Db measurements must be based on a reference. When you say -18db, you are saying a signal is 18db below something. But what? Zero db is obvious, but defining it is not so obvious. Example: if you are dealing with telecommunications audio you are most likely dealing with zero db being the level of a 1 volt p-p sine wave at 1khz across a 600 ohm load. (this reference is notated as dbm).There a quite a few standards like this, like kaw. says, like for TV, Movies, concerts, etc. Many manufacturers make up thier own, but they usually put it in the specs, usually in the spectrum analysis curve ( db v. freq)

    Past that, a decibel is a decibel and has a finite value, no mater what the reference, but what one manufacturer calls line level and what another calls it can vary widely to the point where you have to sit down with the spec sheets and figure it out to +/-1 db or less to get the results you want.

    personally, I like Dave's short answer as a kinda general let's-just-get-it-to-work-right-now scenario because it usually does work.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

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