Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28
  1. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cooranbong
    Posts
    8

    Converting HD video to SD video

    I use Premiere CS3 and CineForm.

    On CineForms advice I also purchased ULead Digital Media Factory v 6 PLUS.

    They say that Adobe media encoder does not handle this very well and suggested that I
    1. Save the project to Folder (ie you get the VOB and TS files etc.) Then
    2. import it into DMF v 6+ and then burn your project.

    They seem to think that this way you get maximum SD quality for your HDV films. It works for me OK.

    Dare i mention that other forums [ ]) have various "best" workflows to achieve this and they use the free programmes too. I think the Canon HV20 forum offers a few approaches.

  2. #12
    New Member RDMS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    7
    Quote
    Quote: tonsofpcs
    View Post
    What differences do you notice between the two scaling methods?
    With close examination I have found that you will always have little moments where you can see "blocking" as a result of down-conversion.
    "Any video converter" creates this artifact at a minimum and only in rapid movement of confused detail( leaves on a tree etc.).
    Procoder does not produce this artifact, but I find that it's end result is too saturated and looks like the detail has shifted (a bit like water on a sheet of paper affects pen marks). It's always a trade off but "Any video converter" gives an amazing overall result.
    The program is pitched at creating video for youtube etc. So I guess their compression algorythms have to be good when you consider the potential squeeze down to 320 x 240.

    As an aside to this I have created a preset for compositelab pro that reduces the blocking artifacts to negligable. when converting HD to SD with "Any video converter". Mostly grain, gaussian blur, contrast and brightness. Order of flow is HDavi - compositelab pro - "Any video converter"
    Last edited by RDMS; 16th Jan 2008 at 13:16. Reason: clarification of personal ramblings

  3. #13
    No offense, but you seem to be a walking billboard for this "any video converter" and you don't explain any issues with the Adobe scaling method.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  4. #14
    New Member RDMS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    7

    Noted

    Yes, I must admit that it looks that way...
    The adobe scaling method is fine... As are those of other EDITING platforms.
    What most editing platforms seem to lack is the ability to create DVD mpegs that are as clear as the source avi.
    I have personally tried about 20 different software applications in the quest for perfection in translation of HD to DVD.
    Stand alone converters do a better job than editing programs (to be expected) but even they have issues.

    If I seem like a walking advert it's just that I got quite excited that the best results I achieved were with a ridiculously cheap program.
    I would suggest you download the trial version. Do your own comparison with favourite program then give me your opinion.

    In no way do I cast myself as an expert. I am simply suggesting a solution that I have found to a common problem. There will always be differing opinions as to the "perfect" solution and brand loyalty always rears it's ugly head. In my case I use whatever works for me and I couldn't care less what logo appears on it.


    I use Adobe Encore myself, but it is in no way a DO-ALL piece of software.
    It's results are better than most, but you still see picture degredation in it's mpeg-2's. Mostly softening of the picture in my view.

    What is your personal opinion of Adobe's conversion quality?
    Last edited by RDMS; 18th Jan 2008 at 08:47. Reason: additional

  5. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    6
    RDMS-

    I am new to this site, as I was researching the same problem. I'm capturing video using a Black Magic Intensity Pro in 1080, and want to convert it to SD for a standard DVD player. I tried Any Video Converter Pro, and it works great for keeping the video quality from AVI to MPEG for DVD, but only when converting from an SD AVI to SD MPEG. When I try to convert from an HD file, it says "Seek failed on an unnamed file." I'm using the trial version, and I'm wondering if it will allow this operation when I purchase the program. Thoughts?

    Thanks in advance from the newby.
    Last edited by Urbanator; 29th Jan 2008 at 06:42.

  6. #16
    I recommend recapturing the footage and down converting in the camera during capture into an SD project.

  7. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    6
    I'm actually capturing from my DVR, but I can capture in SD. I was hoping that capturing in HD and converting to SD DVD would yield better quality than capturing in SD and doing a straight conversion to MPEG. Maybe I'm just being optimistic?

  8. #18
    Actually down converting in the device will give you better quality, check it out.

  9. #19
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks Chuck,

    I agree that's the best way to do it. However, going back to the OP's question (sort of), is there better software to convert AVI clips to a DVD movie without losing quality? I don't know enough to make the jump to higher priced programs, so I'm just using Premier Elements. While it works great for putting clips together for DVD's, it seems to degrade the image quality when converting/authoring. If I leave the imported clips as AVI, Elements seems to compress the video too much (making a 2.5gb DVD out of a 12gb AVI file), which I'm assuming adds to the degradation, and it doesn't have an option to choose how much compression you want. Maybe I need to upgrade the program or find one that does a better job at converting?

  10. #20
    Not sure exactly what your problem is but, the AVI is converted to MPEG for creation of the DVD Video. That is what any program will do when authoring, some start with MPEG and only convert what was edited, Premiere Elements is a bit different in that respect.

    12GB of AVI is just under 1 hour, you can fit a little more than one hour on a DVD. Are you capturing from a miniDV camcorder over Firewire directly into Premiere Elements? If not, and you are converting to AVI and then editing and burning, that could be more the problem than anything else.

    I highly recommend the forum at muvipix.com for solving quality issues, they are very knowledgeable when it comes to any version of Premiere Elements .

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube