Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1

    I am a graphic designer who lives in Toronto and new for the video editing lingo.

    What formats do use for exporting video for display in computers and televisions sets.

    What do work better for DVDs 4:3 or 16:9 ; 29.98, 24 or 15 fps; ? Interlaced or progressive?

    What would the advantages be of working with MPEG or AVI?

    What kind of movie-export codecs work better for windows; right now I am working with MPEG 4 and I have to send the AVI file along with the DivX because not many computers have that codec built in.

    How affects the bit depth a movie and would be the substantial differences between 8/16/24?

    How the data rate affects a DVD?

    Is there someone who works in AVID and is willing to teach some hours?

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Te Awamutu, New Zealand
    Posts
    3,959
    Blog Entries
    79
    Hi Seis and welcome to the forum.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    What formats do use for exporting video for display in computers and televisions sets.
    There are many choices for computer delivery. The most popular ones (in no particular order) are Quicktime, MPEG, DivX, Windows Media, Real Media and Flash. For many people it's a constant battle deciding which one(s) are best. For television sets, DV and MPEG are common edit/delivery formats.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    What do work better for DVDs 4:3 or 16:9 ; 29.98, 24 or 15 fps; ? Interlaced or progressive?
    16:9 if you can. That's the way of the future.
    29.98 fps for NTSC countries (USA, Japan, etc), 25 fps for PAL/SECAM countries

    As for the interlaced/progressive argument, that's a slightly thorny one. There are competing standards and if you look around the Internet you'll see arguments on both sides. Try search for "interlaced vs progressive" and read some of the articles.
    For most people, interlaced = TV and progressive = computer monitors. Most video is shot and edited interlaced. The main thing to remember is to match your sources - if the footage was recorded interlaced, capture and edit interlaced. Same goes for progressive.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    What would the advantages be of working with MPEG or AVI?
    MPEG file sizes are much smaller. MPEG-2 is used for DVD.
    AVI retains more information (it is less compressed), so files are easier and better quality to edit with.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    What kind of movie-export codecs work better for windows; right now I am working with MPEG 4 and I have to send the AVI file along with the DivX because not many computers have that codec built in.
    You're right, DivX is good quality but a lot of people don't have it. Most people would have Windows Media and/or Quicktime.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    How affects the bit depth a movie and would be the substantial differences between 8/16/24?
    16 bit can help reduce file size for computer use, but full-quality video uses 24 bit.

    Quote
    Quote: SEIS
    How the data rate affects a DVD?
    DVD video is usually between 3 and 6 Mbps. Higher rates mean better quality but less disk space. Aim to get the best data rate while still fitting all the video on the disk.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube