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  1. #1

    Limiting bandwidth on self-served streaming media

    Not a lot of traffic on this site, so I thought I would through a little your way

    Background:
    I recently added "streaming media" to one of my websites, except its not truly streaming ... I created a dll that embeds an activeX control at runtime (I used the dll rather than embedding the control directly, because it allows to change content at runtime).

    The videos being played on this embedded control are avis' I encoded myself...generally at extremily high average bit rates for high quality. This means that just one person visiting the site is going to use 1200 kbits per second of bandwidth just to watch the video!

    So my question:
    Can someone point me to a site that has tutorial or example code in asp.net showing how to throttle the bandwidth useage in exchange for lower quality on the fly, in order to mimic the behavior of real paid-for streaming media services, without actually getting said service?

    Moo...

    Answer: I found my own answer, even faster than I expected. It will regrettably require me converting the videos the flash .flv files...but there are lots of asp.net examples for embedding low-bandwidth flash videos in a website.
    Last edited by Taicho; 14th Oct 2007 at 17:20.

  2. #2
    Instead of converting your files to .flv's and adding asp.net code that you don't understand, try encoding your videos to mpeg-4, wmv-7 or wmv-9 or another such codec designed for use over the internet. The added bonus with this is a huge proportion of windows based systems across the world will be able to play wmv files as it is built into the OS. also you have to take into account people's bandwidth, you may be getting over 1meg download speed but most people won't be able to acheive such high rates, the average is still relatively low (512kbps) this results in, for want of a better word, choking of the download and it will stall all togther.

    at 512kbps download, a one minute video (60secs) will be 512kbps x 60secs=3megabytes per minute of video, quite low i accept but wmv-9 does a good job at low resolutions (352x288)(standard web def).

    therefore any video you try to stream over 512kbps (or whatever your nominal internet connection is 1meg, 2meg etc) it will stall. its something to consider.

    if you still have troubles constraining you vids, use CBR encoding.

    Regards
    Paul C

  3. #3
    Useful informations about bandwidth you can find here http://www.adobe.com/products/flashm..._bandwidth.pdf

  4. #4
    thanks anri thats a good pdf. i recommend it as well.

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