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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    1

    Feedback In Church/Non-acoustically Sound Room

    I recently was hired about 5 months ago as an A/V Technician for a Catholic Church here in Snottsdale, Arizona. The church is all tile and hard surfaces inside and it is a very reverberant room.

    The church coordinators sometimes use 3-4 lavaliers in the room at a time for church readings. I have a problem with feedback when a bunch of lav microphones are open in the room. How do I solve this issue? Should I use non-condensor mics that plug into the lav-packs?

    The ceiling in the center of the church where the altar sits is very high and that is where the readers usually stand. Where the congregation sits the ceilings are relatively low in some areas. The church is all tile, stone tile, and hard surfaces inside. They have the sound booth behind the choir which makes it nearly impossible to mix, because all I'm hearing is the monitor mix from the music pit. Do you have any suggestions?

    I've tried to bring up my concerns with my supervisor at the church (who happens to be the architect for the church) and he thinks that nothing needs to be done. I'm stuck in a bind because the speach intelligability in the room is outrageous. I'm trying to get the best sound out of the system, but I'm having to battle with the room. Is there any sound company that offers free estimates to fix problems in the room? How much does a spectral analysis of the room usually cost?

    Can anyone help?

    Thanks,

    Chris

  2. #2
    You can try playing with EQs on the mic channels to remove feedback. It won't be perfect for recording, but for live sound it may help. Simply place the mics in the room where they normally sit, open them and just slightly pass the feedback threshold with each one and EQ down to remove feedback, slowly bringing the levels up, you should be able to give yourself a bit more room for play in the pots to make their mics easier to mix.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  3. #3
    I'd get a DBX Driverack if you aren't too good with this. It has auto-feedback killer and estimates EQ's for rooms.

  4. #4
    Quote
    Quote: cesenabass
    View Post
    Is there any sound company that offers free estimates to fix problems in the room? How much does a spectral analysis of the room usually cost?
    Try http://www.Mark@soundimprovement.com. He speacializes in Church sound systems.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  5. #5
    Quote
    Quote: cesenabass
    View Post
    I recently was hired about 5 months ago as an A/V Technician for a Catholic Church here in Snottsdale, Arizona. The church is all tile and hard surfaces inside and it is a very reverberant room.

    The church coordinators sometimes use 3-4 lavaliers in the room at a time for church readings. I have a problem with feedback when a bunch of lav microphones are open in the room. How do I solve this issue? Should I use non-condensor mics that plug into the lav-packs?

    The ceiling in the center of the church where the altar sits is very high and that is where the readers usually stand. Where the congregation sits the ceilings are relatively low in some areas. The church is all tile, stone tile, and hard surfaces inside. They have the sound booth behind the choir which makes it nearly impossible to mix, because all I'm hearing is the monitor mix from the music pit. Do you have any suggestions?

    I've tried to bring up my concerns with my supervisor at the church (who happens to be the architect for the church) and he thinks that nothing needs to be done. I'm stuck in a bind because the speach intelligability in the room is outrageous. I'm trying to get the best sound out of the system, but I'm having to battle with the room. Is there any sound company that offers free estimates to fix problems in the room? How much does a spectral analysis of the room usually cost?

    Can anyone help?

    Thanks,

    Chris
    Well what I would do is smack the pfl button and play around with the eq a bit, (not to much so anyone will know, but only so you will here it on your headphones.

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