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Thread: HD Video camera

  1. #1

    HD Video camera

    Anybody knows low cost HD quality Video camera witch has USB connection for computer, and can be use as Web cam?

  2. #2
    No such animal. (well, I'm sure there's one, just not very low cost or high quality)
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
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  3. #3
    Consider the HDD (Hard Disc Drive) camcorders (many brands have them now), and (I think) only Sony and Canon have come up with HDV formats for these cameras.

    They're not pro, but they seem to fit your bill.
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  4. #4
    nager,

    I have a External HDD for my JVC Pro cameras (HDV) they work quite well!
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

  5. #5
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Beware as well, HDV is not HD. Do not be fooled about what is advertised/marketed. If it doesn't specify native HD or just HD - it's not.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  6. #6
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    Then what is “HDV”? And what should you be looking for when buying a High Definition Video camera?

  7. #7
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    Quote: DavyBoy
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    Then what is “HDV”? And what should you be looking for when buying a High Definition Video camera?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDV
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

  8. #8
    I am now a bit confused in the discussion between HD and HDV. I think i have to visit the links you guys posted here. That might clarify it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: devils.master
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    I am now a bit confused in the discussion between HD and HDV. I think i have to visit the links you guys posted here. That might clarify it.
    The wikipedia link that kawsakimx6 provided is a good resource. From what I have understood from that article and some industry meetings I've been to, HDV was created as a way to help transition from SD to HD at the consumer level. Why? Simple, HD was so astronomicially costly, a few years back, for the home buyer. Corners were cut by the manufacturer and was accepted immediately by the prosumers, then the consumer. The professionals of the industry was slow to accept it because it's not broadcast quality (but is occassionally used in short clips). However, the when the consumer saw it, they knew it was the best looking thing on the market.

    So where are we now? We're in another format that was thrown in that had some of the old standards which was keeping the color space of digital video or Rec 601 and could be viewed in 16:9, with near HD specifications due to heavy compression (so it's not HD). Hope this was helpful.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  10. #10
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    HD Video camera

    As it stands in your heading you are asking for advice on a Hard Disk Video camera, of which there are many around. they are very much in the "consumer" or popular market. Easy to use, great for family records and people who do not want to use it for anything more than "ordinary family/holiday use".

    If you think (or know) that you will want to use it for more serious video work in the future, then you should look at a HDV (High Definition Video) camera. You will be early in to this feature and unless you have a bit of spare cash around you will not be able to share your HDV stuff around until BluRay recorders/players become cheaper, but I am using HDV and burning back to tape for archiving for later burning to BluRay. I currently burn my projects to SD and that still gives good quality video.

    The Low end cameras (ie sub $2000 approx) are Canon HV20/Sony, I don't know the model/ Panasonic, i don't know the model/ JVC I don't know the model.

    From the reviews i would not look at JVC at the moment.

    I own a Canon HV20 at that gives me reasonable manual controls which is what i wanted. If you want full manual controls then your price range goes up to $3,000 plus (+++!)


    The Sony and the Canon are much alike, both use mini DV tape and have the external mic plugs etc and have a degree of manual controls. The Sony uses the LCD touch screen for some of its controls, which people say you get used to. I chose not to go that way as I wanted an LCD shader on for much of my work.

    The Panasonic has a solid state recorder which is well supported by software now. That has advantages of less moving parts and "no" camera noise to muck up the sound recording. There are technicalities about the format which i do not fully know enough about to comment on.

    Cameras, like editing programmes, are very personal choices; I happened to choose the Canon HV20 and 6 months in I do not regret my choice, but I am still learning the menus and manual controls as i started with using the point and press controls, which work very well. Now i want to be a bit more sophisticated.

    I got my HV20 off an Australian supplier on Ebay for less than $AUD 1600.
    all up.

    Note: these comments are for the low end prosumer cameras and HDV. if you are really serious then you might like to spend a lot more money

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