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  1. #1

    question about eq in loud room

    Hi, well, I am now running the sound mixer in the main building, the the thing is, there is a lot of reverb in there. I can berly turn up any of the mids on the board without getting any feedback. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    What is your mix for? Is it intended for direct playback to a live audience or is it for recording?
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  3. #3
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    Quote: tonsofpcs
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    What is your mix for? Is it intended for direct pla
    yback to a live audience or is it for recording?

    It is for a live audience.

  4. #4
    Hey, Ivan, How's it going? Two main things, aside from the room itself. Speaker placement and mic placement. That is the first line of defense. Keep the mics behind the speakers. Angling the speakers in a slightly different direction out into the room may help with the room reverb, (which can also help control feedback). If the room's reverb is out of control there is not much you can do short of treating it. You might try introducing a small amount of reverb into the mix (only at the problem frequencies) with a slightly different delay time than the room itself which would have a canceling affect, but it would also make it muddier. Also, compression may help.

    Other than that you could tune the system to the room. There is more than one way to do that. Most involve finding the frequencys most prone to feed back and cutting them down with notch filters set for a steep slope. I sometimes use the filters to trigger a compressor. I don't really recomend that though unless you're really good with compressors.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  5. #5
    Quote
    Quote: penniesfromheaven
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    Hey, Ivan, How's it going? Two main things, aside from the room itself. Speaker placement and mic placement. That is the first line of defense. Keep the mics behind the speakers. Angling the speakers in a slightly different direction out into the room may help with the room reverb, (which can also help control feedback). If the room's reverb is out of control there is not much you can do short of treating it. You might try introducing a small amount of reverb into the mix (only at the problem frequencies) with a slightly different delay time than the room itself which would have a canceling affect, but it would also make it muddier. Also, compression may help.

    Other than that you could tune the system to the room. There is more than one way to do that. Most involve finding the frequencys most prone to feed back and cutting them down with notch filters set for a steep slope. I sometimes use the filters to trigger a compressor. I don't really recomend that though unless you're really good with compressors.
    Well, The thing is, is that the preacher moves around a lot, and he moves in frunt of the mains all the time, then, he blames it on me. Would there be any way to fix this?

  6. #6
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Hi Ivan - Having sound reinforcement in a room that is all hard surfaces is quite a challenge in controlling echoes. In order to make this technically work, you'll have to discuss with the preacher the limitations of the system. It is not your fault and he most likely has no idea that he is the cause. He may not like the idea of his limited movement immediately in front of the speakers but of course he can go anywhere else (or just about). The audio operator has to always be in control of sound, because if it is not under control, there's nothing you can do when it becomes a problem.

    When I use to attend Catholic church, the sound is just so horrible with all the marble and bare wood bouncing the sound all around. If this is the case with hard surfaces and echoing, then maybe one of our audio veterans can share their wisdom.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  7. #7
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    Quote: ivan
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    Well, The thing is, is that the preacher moves around a lot, and he moves in frunt of the mains all the time, then, he blames it on me. Would there be any way to fix this?
    I hear ya. Our Pastor does the same thing. What we did:
    First, we studied the problem untill our eyes bled. Then we:

    Kindly explained to him why we rearanged the stage to block him for most part off the spots that were the worst.

    Got him a Countryman mic with a real tight supercard patterned capsule.

    Eliminated most of the stage monitors by getting in-ears for all the musicians and turned off the rest when the sermon starts.

    Upgraded our amp banks for mono LR so we could turn down just one side if he wandered out too far. (most people don't really notice)

    Traded in our speakers several times and finally had them custom made by a company that made a computer model of the sanctuary and designed the speakers from that.

    Installed computer feedback control.

    Spent entire weekends fine tuning the system.

    Attended every audio symposium and training class that came within a hundred miles.

    Alltogether these have pretty much done the job, but it took about a year. I go to a big church with a system to rival a rock concert, but the budget of a garage band, so money was very much a problem also.

    I don't know if any of these ideas are practical for you, but just keep picking away at it.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  8. #8
    Also, you can set up large curtains wherever you can [if possible]. If there is an open entryway somewhere in the room that doesn't need to be open, put a large, heavy curtain in front of it.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  9. #9
    Quote
    Quote: tonsofpcs
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    Also, you can set up large curtains wherever you can [if possible]. If there is an open entryway somewhere in the room that doesn't need to be open, put a large, heavy curtain in front of it.
    Yea, the operative word is "if". I wish my church would let me do something simple like that, it would save me some asperin. May I suggest 'black out' curtains?
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  10. #10
    Even if they want some new decorative features, suggest large tapestries, they're large, they're cloth, they help stop sound from bouncing all over
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

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