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  1. #11
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I think this could be relevant.... A lot of young filmmakers spend a lot of time working on no-budget versions of effects or other tasks because they can't afford the real thing. Fair enough, but in some cases it's false economy.

    I did a project a while back where I reviewed a filmmaker's strategy and pointed out that she could have got herself a job, saved some money, used the money to do the effects properly, and actually made the film in less time. The no-budget version took so long to make that she would have been better off investing some time in a job to save more time in post-production. Not only that, but the film could have looked much better.

    She was so embarrassed she made me promise never to reveal the details

    I don't actually know if this applies to your case Rodwen but I just thought it was worth mentioning for the sake of discussion. I'd certainly recommend any new filmmaker to have a slush-fund for incidental costs. If nothing else it's a lot more fun making films when you can afford stuff.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  2. #12
    Also remember [especially for low-budget production] that mechanical effects reduce post time immensely (as opposed to digital effects which will increase it)
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  3. #13
    Member Rodwen's Avatar
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    In my defence, to not sound like a lazy git, I do indeed have a job (which I just find out illegally pays me slave-wages :P) and a fund for getting the things I need to make my films. However, at the moment, I'm saving for things like a tripod so I can stop borrowing them, and better lighting. I'd rather have good lighting than contact lenses for one shot.

    Although, since they seem to be quite a bit cheaper than I at first thought, if it's possible I will be using them. To be honest, I detest digital effects. I know they help where things cannot conceivably be achieved, but I much prefer to do things by hand or for real, after seeing the result on the Star Wars prequals!

    with out trying to sound like an ass hole.....if you cant spend 30-40 dollars, the movie is not going to go well!
    I just made the best thing I've ever done on absolutely no budget whatsoever. Even shot on a miniDV tape that was a Christmas gift. Anything is possible

  4. #14
    You could always do the artist's approach and have the character just close his/her eyes
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  5. #15
    Why not fix the eyes in post? You could even Rotoscope the blind eyes if you have the time and the tools

  6. #16
    Member Rodwen's Avatar
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    You could always do the artist's approach and have the character just close his/her eyes
    When? Instead of the glasses or instead of the sheet? Or instead of the eyes altogether?

    Why not fix the eyes in post? You could even Rotoscope the blind eyes if you have the time and the tools
    Well, yeah, that's why we're having this disussion - I'm finding two very opposite opinions, but all are useful. And I could do what you suggest ... if I had the faintest idea what "Rotoscope" was

    Lucky I have lots of time to make this decision! This doesn't go into production until mid-year. (Well, that's not loads of time, but it's better than a few weeks.

  7. #17
    Hi Rodwen
    Your goal needs to be to make the audience believe that she has regained her sight so you don't have to show the miracle happening at all. As suggested get her to close her eyes, drawn the sheet over and then let her exclaim in a loud voice "It's a miracle..I can see again!!!" Your audience will simply accept the fact that the event happened. Cut to a BCU of her face with eyes open and tears running down her face (baby oil from an eye dropper works well) and then you can cut away to birds in the air, flowers etc etc and again the audience will assume she is "seeing" these for the first time ever.

    If your audience is convinced that she can see then you never have to "show" the miracle happening. It's all a matter of good storytelling!!

    Chris

  8. #18
    Just for informational purposes;
    probably the most memorable use of rotoscoping is the saber fights in Star Wars, here is an example of rotoscoping (a very good but time consuming way to achieve some great effects).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotoscoping

    http://www.alienryderflex.com/rotoscope/

    Just imagine doing it to make blinded eyes instead of a light saber effect

  9. #19
    i have the perfect website for you my man

    this guy Andrew has some really good tutorials on after effects, and this tutorial shows you how to replace an eye on a face, and it is really really good

    http://www.videocopilot.net/tutorial.html?id=92

    this tutorial shows you a step by step procedure on how to do this

    lemme know what you think

    enjoy

  10. #20
    Member Rodwen's Avatar
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    That eye tutorial is brilliant! Since I already have access to after effects, I think this might be the best way to go, if I can work that properly. Looks like some whacky fun too.

    Thanks so much

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