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  1. #11
    Thanks nagar,

    You guys are making it a much more enjoyable experience, so I appreciate all of you



    Quote
    Quote: nagar
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    Haha... that was a good one.

    New equipment, formats change frequently, and especially now where new technology breaks into the market every other month... this makes integration of new to existing work flows tough. What to keep, what to forget...

    Well, from the way you share, I believe these are and will be fun challenges for you...

    So, have lots of fun!

  2. #12

    Resizing digital photos for the web

    You are experiencing a often confused aspect of digital photography. Resolution on a computer monitor for viewing photos on the web is either 72 pixels per inch (ppi) or 96 ppi. Most digital cameras are set either on a RAW or jpg Fine when a print is going to be made. These are the highest quality settings the cameras can be set to. For use on the web, set you camera to jpg small. This will usually produce a file that will correctly display approximately a 3.5" x 5" photo at 72dpi on a computer monitor. At the same time, this small file will NOT produce a print worth looking at but will be fine for viewing on a computer monitor.

    Another method to achieve the same results is to use the Image/Resize command in Photoshop (or equivalent). Choose the new size for one dimension (either width or height) and make sure that the "constrain proportions" is checked. Also enter a value of 72 dpi for the final resolution. When the image is resized, select view and choose "actual size" to see what the final result will look like. If to fuzzy, click undo under edit and repeat with a higher resolution until you are happy.

    Just make sure that you reset your camera to the higher resoluion for making prints when you are done. As most of my work is for making prints, I use the second method as I can always lower the quality in Photoshop, but can never raise the quality after taking the photo. This way the settings in my camera never changes.

  3. #13
    You are experiencing a often confused aspect of digital photography. Resolution on a computer monitor for viewing photos on the web is either 72 pixels per inch (ppi) or 96 ppi. Most digital cameras are set either on a RAW or jpg Fine when a print is going to be made. These are the highest quality settings the cameras can be set to. For use on the web, set your camera to jpg small. This will usually produce a file that will correctly display approximately a 3.5" x 5" photo at 72dpi on a computer monitor. At the same time, this small file will NOT produce a print worth looking at but will be fine for viewing on a computer monitor.

    Another method to achieve the same results is to use the Image/Resize command in Photoshop (or equivalent). Choose the new size for one dimension (either width or height) and make sure that the "constrain proportions" is checked. Also enter a value of 72 dpi for the final resolution. When the image is resized, select view and choose "actual size" to see what the final result will look like. If to fuzzy, click undo under edit and repeat with a higher resolution until you are happy.

    Just make sure that you reset your camera to the higher resoluion for making prints when you are done. As most of my work is for making prints, I use the second method as I can always lower the quality in Photoshop, but can never raise the quality after taking the photo. This way the settings in my camera never changes.

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