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  1. #1

    fantom powered microphones

    What is the difference between microphones that requier fantom power and microphones that do not? What are the advantages and disadvantigase?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  2. #2
    Phantom mics get their power from the camera/mixer/amp they are plugged into. I like them better because there is no batteries to mess with
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

  3. #3
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    Quote: ivan
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    What is the difference between microphones that requier fantom power and microphones that do not? What are the advantages and disadvantigase?
    The usual difference would be that the ones requiring phantom power would be condenser microphones, the ones that do not would either be a dynamic mic or a ribbon mic. Condensers require phantom power in order to operate, they have two plates that would have a field between them and operate by sound pressure changeing that field, dynamic mics use a diaphragm where pressure moves the diaphragm and creates signal in a coil. ( the opposite of a speaker) ribbon mics would lean toward more of a dynamic mic operation, the benifits of use of condenser mics is that they would be more sensitive as it takes far less sound pressure to create signal in the microphone thus in recording would lend themselves to pick up more detail, or pickup at further distances such as a shotgun mic, dynamic mics find themselves useful in both live and recording but would be found more exclusively in live applications vs condensers although condensers have uses for live apps as well, and in live i am refering to something with sound reinforcement being involved. Now there are uses for phantom power in a microphone that may not fall under the condenser mic alone such as a dynamic mic with a built in preamp would use phantom for its operation, or if there are other features on the mic such as lighting as in the ( HEIL fin ) microphone or for switching feature like podium mics and so on.

  4. #4
    Don't make generalizations like that because royer and brauner have made some phantom powered mics, royers being ribbons. How? I dont know...

    The advantage is phantom powered mics usually have a higher output, so if you don't have a $1000 preamp, it will sound better.

    If you have good preamps, theres no difference really.

  5. #5
    Now there are uses for phantom power in a microphone that may not fall under the condenser mic alone such as a dynamic mic with a built in preamp would use phantom for its operation, or if there are other features on the mic such as lighting as in the ( HEIL fin ) microphone or for switching feature like podium mics and so on.

    Read The whole thing, Its only a general guide , and yes I have phantom powered Ribbon Mics!!! If someone doesnt have a clue as to what Phantom power or a dynamic vs Condenser we don't need to go into case specific scenarios do we? List how many mics require phantom that are not condensers and we are talking a very small percentage aren't we, I also use phantom powered dynamic mics as well but again how many are there?

  6. #6

    phantom

    Mics can be divided into 3 general classifications.

    1. Dynamic and ribbon mics generate their output signal directly from the actual acoustic power in the sound they pick up. Thus they require no external power source.

    2. Condenser mic elements, by themselves, create almost no electrical power. There is an AC audio voltage coming off the diaphragm, but it's extremely delicate and wouldn't survive being sent through two feet of cable. So a condenser mic always includes an amplifier, right in the mic, and usually right in the pickup element. An amplifier requires an external power source to operate. Some extremely expensive condenser mics have separate power supplies and special cables with lots of wires, but in most cases the internal amplifier is powered by DC that is "piggybacked" on the signal wires.

    3. Although dynamic and ribbon mics don't need external power to operate, sometimes there's an advantage to doing some electronic signal processing right at the mic. This requires external power. Thus the rather odd case of phantom-powered dynamic and ribbon mics.

    Advantages and disadvantages depend on what you're after. Dynamic mics can be extremely rugged. Ribbon mics have a beautiful smooth, warm sound that caresses acoustic guitars and grand pianos. Condenser mics have comparatively high output, which helps tame system hiss. They also have naturally smooth high frequency response that is difficult to achieve with a dynamic mic; thus a cheap condenser mic will sound more natural than a medium-priced dynamic mic. On the other hand, strictly natural sound isn't always what you want. Some condenser mics, especially vocal mics, are deliberately colored to imitate classic dynamic vocal mics.

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