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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    HK
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    how should solve this???

    hey guys, i'm still a newbie in the sound industry. hope that you guys can help answer the following questions:

    1. Recently i am working in a concert hall, during performances, there are occasionally loud and irritating buzzing sound coming from the channels i am using. I was thinking if there was something wrong with the wiring of the concert hall leading to the mixer or if there is something to do with electromagnetism since there may be power cables running underground. But that should not be the case, since the cables are usually insulated.

    2. Any recommendations of microphones for miking an orchestra and choir???

    3. If i am getting a new outdoor system, should i purchase the mixer, amps and speakers separately or should i purchase it as a set?

    Thanks. Your help will be greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Quote
    Quote: eugene
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    hey guys, i'm still a newbie in the sound industry. hope that you guys can help answer the following questions:

    1. Recently i am working in a concert hall, during performances, there are occasionally loud and irritating buzzing sound coming from the channels i am using. I was thinking if there was something wrong with the wiring of the concert hall leading to the mixer or if there is something to do with electromagnetism since there may be power cables running underground. But that should not be the case, since the cables are usually insulated.
    What type of cabling are you using? What sort of 'buzzing'? a light hum maybe?

    2. Any recommendations of microphones for miking an orchestra and choir???
    depends on how much you will need to control the levels in different regions.

    3. If i am getting a new outdoor system, should i purchase the mixer, amps and speakers separately or should i purchase it as a set?
    depends on your needs and if a prebuilt system meets them.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    2
    1. I am using the normal XLR 3pin cables and the buzzing sound isn't just a soft hum. I have tried using the equalizer to solve this problem but to no avail. In fact, it gets louder occasionally. I am also suspecting whether it has anything to do with the interference and balanced/unbalanced wires.

    2. I have found out what is best for me already. thanks alot.

    3. The outdoor system is mainly used for campfires and singing competitions held outdoor. Any general advice on what to get???

  4. #4
    Most of the time buzzing sounds in concerts occur because the audio equipment and the lighting equipment are supplied with power from the same phase of the network. Usualy the buzzing sound gets louder when a lot of lights are dimmed so it would be a good idea to turn on all of your equipment and check if the buzzing sound gets louder when you dim the lights. If something like that happens then you can use the old trick on witch you cover with tape the ground connector of the amps power plugs. You have to be careful though cause doing something like that will not ground the amplifiers so in case of a lightning the whole thing will explode, i used this trick many times in live events and never had a problem but just keep the explosion thing in mind

  5. #5

    Sound/hum/buzz

    Check your XLR mic cables are not running across electricity supply cables especially to stand alone lighting, you can buy 'barriers' to cover the cables but these do fail and usually mid signal. Best solution is to use as many cables as poss and follow the line of the electric cabling and and not cross it gaffer tape it to death go up and around door frames/under carpets is good if they are rubber backed you really have to improvise to get a clean signal. As the last post said dimming causes hassle so chat with the gaffers see what they have in mind they will help you out.
    Another cause of interference could well be your power supply..if all the eqipment is running from the normal 240 supply especially in an old building this will cause a hum in the line. If the sparks have a generator truck ask them for a line to 240 and plug into that.
    For outdoor recording buy some PZM mics and put them on the floor in between the people to be recorded and if poss suspend senn 416s over the top without burning them ha! campfires are loud so you may want to consider radio mics on the artists/performers and use a boom mic to cover the fire you can then control the fire level on its own channel and you can wildtrack it too to give you options in post re the fire level.
    See you have your mic issues..hope this helps.

  6. #6

    lifting ground pins

    I always get uncomfy when I see people lifting safety ground pins. I know it's necessary at times. Make yourself up an extension box with GFI outlets so you at least have that protection.

    You may have to invest in a power line conditioner. Those things are mostly snake oil, but when there's dimmer noise on the line they can be a godsend.

    Find out where the AC lines are and keep your mic lines away from them. If you must cross an AC line, do it at a sharp right angle. This cancels electromagnetic interference and minimizes electrostatic interference.

    If you get a chance, listen to one mic at a time. You may find out all your buzz is coming in on one channel, which is a red flag for a defective cable or mic. Most phantom-powered mics will keep working, sort of, even with one of the two wires completely broken.

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