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  1. #1

    Hello everyone!!!!

    My name is George Cotgreave and i am a Sound Engineer. On December i returned from Denmark, where i was working as a SE in a small TV station for young people. Now i am in Greece and i found a job in a TV station with almost NO Budget!!!! In the add they had they were asking for a SE but now that i got the job i realised that i have to do EVERYTHING my self When i was in Denmark i learned a few stuff about cameras and tricasters but i cannot run a whole station myself. I found some very interesting tutorials on this web site so i signed up on your forum. I am almost a total newbie on TV production so please show mercy..

  2. #2
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Hello George and welcome!

    As a mixed group of different backgrounds, we try to help out with questions. Although we can't help you with your job, hopefully you'll get the answer that best suits your needs.

    Just beware - you might get a dozen answers that would work .
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #3
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Welcome George, congratulations on your new "management" position

    It sounds like a great challenge. I think there's a lot of advantages in being thrown in the deep end, as long as you're willing to accept the challenge and learn new stuff. Lack of budget may make things difficult but on the other hand it forces you to be more resourceful.

    Early in my TV career I worked with the two biggest broadcasters in my country and I assumed it would be the best training available. It was very good but it did have some disadvantages, for example I sometimes had to wait months to get any new opportunities or learn new skills.

    A few years later I needing a job in a city where the only full-time work was at a station much lower in the food chain. I thought this was a step backwards but I soon found another angle. Because this station found it harder to attract good staff, those with good skills are highly valued and given lots of opportunities. I was sent on courses, trained in various roles and within a couple of years I was promoted to full-time OB director with management responsibilities.

    I've since used the skills I gained at the low-budget station to do work for bigger production companies in better roles. One of my biggest selling points is the way I can improvise and work in less-than-ideal situations.

    There's a lot to be said for spending time in low-budget or otherwise difficult production environments. I think it makes you a better professional in the long run. You just wouldn't want to spend you entire career there if you can help it
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  4. #4
    Thnx for the advices Dave I was thinking the same way my self meaning that in a small station like that there is more ''space'' to practice and experiment with different techniques untill you achieve the results you want. I have been working the past 5-6 years as a sound engineer on various positions (live,theatre,tv,studio) and i have an idea how the ''whole thing'' works but i never had the chance to experiment with it in that level, i hope everything works out well!!!!

  5. #5
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Sounds like you've got a solid background. I hope the new position provides you with plenty of fun as well as new challenges.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  6. #6
    I guess for the many of us out there who started from the OMO (one man operation) would agree on the benefits, on hindsight sometimes. To be honest, where I come from, the film market is so small that unless you're a big name in production/working with national TV, your resources are really limited. But those times raises our learning curves and adaptability, and yes, like what Dave mentions, gives us a another selling point!

    There's a famous director in my country who has won lots of international awards and have his films screened in different prestigious international film festivals (incl being invited as Jury on other country's national film festival), yet struggles to raise enough money to make more films! I'm applying to take a month break from my formal work to join him if there are projects on his end.

    So hang in there Cotgreave!
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  7. #7
    Oh man, not another Sound engineer.


    welcome, you will find that there are a bunch of different skills here on the forums that can not only help you but use your help as well. If there is anything spicific that you need, please feel free to ask. I my self am in charge of a TV station here in The States. (yeah i know, they put ME in charge ) as well as own a production company here.
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

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