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  1. #1

    mid range feedback ring

    Hi, I was running sound yesterday for the service we have, and for some odd reason, I kep getting a mid feedback ring. I played with the eq, and nothing worked. I was using a four band eq at the time, so it should have frixed it, but I got nothing. I notest sometimes it got louder, and sometimes it was softer.
    Any suyggestions?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  2. #2
    first thing to do is find which scource coming into the mixer is causing the problem. Then if you have a sweepable mid frequency on that channel set the amplitude to say -10 to -15 db and sweep the frequency to find where it is minimized, chances are if you are using lavaliers which many are an omni pickup pattern that they would be the most likely candidates for this type of situation. If there is some result yet still somewhat problematic try inserting a graphic eq or parametric eq on that specific channel.... hope that answers at least some of your issues as it is unknown to me what frequencies you are having issues with and what scource is causing the problem

  3. #3
    Quote
    Quote: peter miller
    View Post
    first thing to do is find which scource coming into the mixer is causing the problem. Then if you have a sweepable mid frequency on that channel set the amplitude to say -10 to -15 db and sweep the frequency to find where it is minimized, chances are if you are using lavaliers which many are an omni pickup pattern that they would be the most likely candidates for this type of situation. If there is some result yet still somewhat problematic try inserting a graphic eq or parametric eq on that specific channel.... hope that answers at least some of your issues as it is unknown to me what frequencies you are having issues with and what scource is causing the problem
    Well the mic that we are using is a headset wierless mic. I had the sweep around 12 o clock, sometimes moving it to 8 or 9 o clock. Any more suggestions?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  4. #4
    if its a constant feedback, you need to be more aggressive with the ammount you remove when you are trying to isolate the problem, you can reasonably season to taste after that. Remeber that your midrange has two controls that are associated with it, one will be the frequency and the other the ammount that you are adding or removing most +15 to -15db , maybe it is a matter of grasping the working of that concept, if you already understand that then it would be a matter of placement of the speakers versus where the person is standing as to minimize the exposure of the microphone to the sound coming out of the speakers, and that would be the primary culprit of the feedback to begin with.

  5. #5
    Quote
    Quote: peter miller
    View Post
    if its a constant feedback, you need to be more aggressive with the ammount you remove when you are trying to isolate the problem, you can reasonably season to taste after that. Remeber that your midrange has two controls that are associated with it, one will be the frequency and the other the ammount that you are adding or removing most +15 to -15db , maybe it is a matter of grasping the working of that concept, if you already understand that then it would be a matter of placement of the speakers versus where the person is standing as to minimize the exposure of the microphone to the sound coming out of the speakers, and that would be the primary culprit of the feedback to begin with.
    I had the mid range all the way down, and it still gave me a ring. Why is this?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  6. #6
    oh and one mor thing, it was only when the persons voice reached a cirten pich. Does that help?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  7. #7
    As peter said the first thing to do is to be sure from witch channel of the mixer the feedback is coming. I don't know what kind of mixer you are using (could help if you reveal witch one you are using) but some mixers have an ''ON/OFF'' or ''ByPass'' button for the EQ be sure the EQs are on. You said you ''sweeped'' the frequency rotary with the lavel at -15dB and nothing happened, that sounds really odd normally you should be able to hear some difference in the sound. Last thing is the positioning of the monitors. BTW did you do a sound check before starting the event?

  8. #8
    Sometimes what I've thought was mid-range turned out to actually be more hi-mid (like between 1k-800). If it was when they were singing... I've found singers/instruments can sometimes tend to peak/clash something fierce around 1.25k and/or at about 450 (especially if the singers are accompanied by a Yamaha keyboard. Depending on the acoustics of the room, those are notorious for peaking around 450).

    But, like it was said, if you noticed no change in tone by sweeping the frequency range, then you might want to double check that the EQ was actually on and not being bypassed.

  9. #9

    feedback

    Simple answer: Turn It Down!

    Lots of people are under the impression that they need to get every last ounce of gain they can. I've never seen a case of ringing that isn't cured by turning the master gain down 3dB, and 3dB is a very minor gain change. Nobody will notice. But they will notice that the ring disappears.

    Did you only have one mic open, the wireless headset mic? Headset mics are extremely good when it comes to feedback, because they are so close to the talker's mouth. If you have only that one mic open and you're still getting feedback, something is way wrong - like the person is standing right in front of a speaker.

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