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Thread: Volume Question

  1. #1
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    Volume Question

    First let me state that i feel retarded for asking this.... when hooking up equipment to a mixer such as drum machines and keyboards what volume should they be set?

  2. #2
    It's going to be a balacing act between the units output level and the mixers input level, so I'd say send a good strong signal, but not max. You're going to trim the input gain so that it is coming into the board around -0-, aren't you? if not, it may be time you looked into how you determine your rig's gain structure.....

  3. #3
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    Quote: Phoenix
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    First let me state that i feel retarded for asking this.... when hooking up equipment to a mixer such as drum machines and keyboards what volume should they be set?
    First of all, dont feal retarded for asking a question, because there is no such thing as a retarded question. If you dont know something, the best thing to do is to ask.
    As for how the volume should be set, there is a few ways you could figger this out:
    one thing you could do is set your main out in the middel, rais the faders to the top, and ajust the main and lisson for how loud you want it to be.
    another thing you could do is watch the meater on the mixer, that helps a lot, but I can not use it, but that is something else I could recomend.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  4. #4
    depending on what mixer you are working with, I would reccomend all keboard patches be set to 127 and if its too hot pad the input at the mixer that way the there is no way for it to exceed unity, if you do not have a pad on the mixer then you will have to determine the appropriate gain structure. That is of course if you are recording or mixing someone else playing that way as patches are switched there is not an extreme change in volume that may cause input clipping, drum machines normally would be the same depending on the machine.

  5. #5
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    Quote: ivan
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    one thing you could do is set your main out in the middel, rais the faders to the top, and ajust the main and lisson for how loud you want it to be.


    another thing you could do is watch the meater on the mixer, that helps a lot, but I can not use it, but that is something else I could recomend.
    Uh, if you are doing it the first way, you are doing it the wrong way. THe whole game of running audio is to be carefully paying attention to your gain structure so as to not introduce extra noise or cause any distortion.

    What you should do, for all channels on a mixer, is solo or PFL them (whichever your board may have) and adjust the input so that each channel is coming in around the -0- mark on your meter, give it +3 for peaks, but not much more than that, then you have a good signal that won't overload the channels input ciruitry and won't be boosting a lot of moise if you need to run the fader a little higher.... Meters are there for a reason, use them, learn them and you will learn to love them.

  6. #6
    Quote
    Quote: Bassred
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    Uh, if you are doing it the first way, you are doing it the wrong way. THe whole game of running audio is to be carefully paying attention to your gain structure so as to not introduce extra noise or cause any distortion.

    What you should do, for all channels on a mixer, is solo or PFL them (whichever your board may have) and adjust the input so that each channel is coming in around the -0- mark on your meter, give it +3 for peaks, but not much more than that, then you have a good signal that won't overload the channels input ciruitry and won't be boosting a lot of moise if you need to run the fader a little higher.... Meters are there for a reason, use them, learn them and you will learn to love them.
    I keep the preamp about 12 noon, and I ride the main out.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  7. #7
    That would be great if every output source (microphones, line-outs, etc) always put out the exact same level of signal, but they don't that is why there is even a gain knob on mixers, to adjust the input level to a nominal level. the faders are going to give you a more controlled adjustment for the channels level in the mix, but shouldn't be used to correct poor gain structure...

  8. #8

    gain structure

    The only truly retarded question is the one that isn't asked, thus leaving the person ignorant when help would have been available.

    Gain structure is an important and complex issue, but a few rules of thumb if you haven't got the time or the test gear:

    1. Set the power amp control no lower than 2-o'clock. Otherwise, the mixer may run out of gas before the amp does, and your 200W amp turns into a 40W amp.

    2. Individual mix channel pots and master pots should be set somewhere near the same. If you set the master pot way down and then turn channel gain way up to compensate, you'll get clipping on the mix bus. If you set the master all the way up and set channel gain down to compensate, you'll get hiss.

    3. If you find yourself with both channel and master gains set way high, you've got the input gain set too low. If they're both set low, the input gain is probably too high. With any luck, the mixer will have a clipping LED on the input so you'll know when you're getting into trouble.

    In general, channel gain and master gain should usually be somewhere in the middle third of their travel. If not, that's a red flag.

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