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Thread: Hi-z and Lo-z?

  1. #1

    Hi-z and Lo-z?

    What are they? Can anyone explain to me cause i dunno which to use for guitars and bass guitars and keyboards and even microphones... I'm currently using the Phonic Power POD 1060... There are Hi-z and Lo-z which i dunno what im supposed to do. Someone kindly explain to me what are they and also if u have one of the same type of mixers teach me every speck of it thanks!

  2. #2
    This hi-z and low-z, are they knobs? I need mor information to be able to explain more.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  3. #3
    Quote
    Quote: xxrevilexx
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    What are they? Can anyone explain to me cause i dunno which to use for guitars and bass guitars and keyboards and even microphones... I'm currently using the Phonic Power POD 1060... There are Hi-z and Lo-z which i dunno what im supposed to do. Someone kindly explain to me what are they and also if u have one of the same type of mixers teach me every speck of it thanks!
    High Impedence and Low impedance!!!!

    Microphones = Low-Z

    Instruments (guit, Bass, Keys, CD players, so on) = High-Z

    Not always 100% the case but its good to start there,

  4. #4
    Peter was right on

    High Z is high impudence, read the impedances and make sure they match, I believe if the input claims to be hi-z it should be high enough for instruments

  5. #5

    lol

    Quote
    Quote: ivan
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    This hi-z and low-z, are they knobs? I need mor information to be able to explain more.

    Nope they are not nobs they are just labels that label the pointsthe 1 1/4 inch cables are the Hi-Z and the dunno what u call it the one which is a circle with a few holes like rectangles usually or microphones is the Lo-Z

  6. #6
    Quote
    Quote: xxrevilexx
    View Post
    Nope they are not nobs they are just labels that label the pointsthe 1 1/4 inch cables are the Hi-Z and the dunno what u call it the one which is a circle with a few holes like rectangles usually or microphones is the Lo-Z
    Oh sorry, Now I know what you are talking about. I was beeing stupid, like usial.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  7. #7
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    yes the hi-z and lo-z lowers the impedence on certain devices to help lower the output of the device. Helps also eliminate hums.

  8. #8
    Ok, Z stands for the impedance of the input or output, Hi-Z inputs are usualy balanced so they have XLR connectors on the other hand Lo-Z inputs are unbalanced and they use JackTS (mono) connectors. On most of the cases you can see what goes where just by checking the plugs. Devices with Hi-Z outputs like microphones have XLR outputs (microphones) be careful though because some devices have a balanced Hi-Z output but they use a JackTRS (stereo) connector to carry out the signal. Devices with Lo-Z output like instruments or cd players always use JackTS or RCA connectors.

  9. #9

    hi-z lo-z

    Hi-Z = quarterback. Not brawny but very fast.
    Lo-Z = lineman. Not fast but very brawny.

    Same power in either case, but the ratio is different. The electrical equivalent is: Hi-Z is high voltage, low current; Lo-Z is low voltage, high current.

    Lo-Z has always been the professional audio standard, because its sturdiness makes it relatively immune to damage. It doesn't lose high frequencies over long cable runs, and it isn't overly sensitive to hum and buzz.

    Hi-Z exists because it's a legacy. It was handy back in the days of tube amps, because tubes have a naturally high impedance input. 'Course, good guitar amps are still made with tubes, and guitar cords are usually short so you don't have problems with line loss.

    If you need to, you can convert one to the other by using a transformer.

  10. #10
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Nicely put, Karl
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

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