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  1. #1

    studio monitors getting hot

    I work at home doing audio mixing (mixdowns) for local bands. I turn everything on around 8 in the morning, and leave everything on untill maby about 10 or 11 someimtes even 12 or 2 in the morning. When I turn everything off, everything is hot. I use a Berenger (sorry for the spelling) mixer, and 2 Rocket five monitors. When these to things get hot, is there any harm?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I don't feel completely confident answering this question, hopefully a technician will reply as well. My opinion is that moderate heating is normal and okay but excessive heating is best avoided. You're doing a lot of hours with that equipment which will eventually take its toll - everything has a lifespan.

    I like to keep my equipment well ventilated. I use a fan where possible to keep air circulating around anything that might get too hot. Obviously this can be an issue when working with audio but good ventilation is important IMO.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    I agree with Dave. Do what you can to vent any trapped hot/warm air around equipment to alleviate a possible shorter lifespan.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  4. #4
    So does any one have any idea on what mite happen when the monitors finily do give out?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  5. #5
    KRK does not list an operating temperature, but suggests the following in their manual for the ROKIT speakers:

    The unit should be installed so that its location or position does not interfere with its proper ventilation. For example, it should not be situated on a bed, sofa, rug or similar surface that may block the ventilation openings; or placed in a built-in installation, such as a bookcase or cabinet, that may impede the flow of air through its ventilation openings.

    So basically, if you leave some space around it for air to flow, it should be fine. As for everything else, if you are worried you should keep at least 1RU of empty space between each item. Remember, electronics operating will be warm to the touch, but shouldn't be so hot that they will burn you, each product should list operating and storage temperatures in their manuals... apparently KRK doesn't.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
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  6. #6
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote
    Quote: ivan
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    So does any one have any idea on what mite happen when the monitors finily do give out?
    Any electronic component has their tolerance to heat. Excessive heat will cause breakdown at it's weakest point. It could be something in the power supply, crossover circuits, dried and brittle speaker, it could be anything else I didn't think of. What if it doesn't give it out? What if it just intermittently loses audio? Intermittent problems are the hardest to troubleshoot.

    During the early years of digital amps, the audio would cut off when it reached it's digital cliff because the internal components would get too hot, when the room got too hot.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  7. #7
    Try running it for a day without sending any audio thru it. If it gets hot then, something is definitely wrong. Either something broken or the system is oscillating at a supersonic frequency.

    Try doing a day's worth of non-critical mixing at a fiarly low monitor level. Does it get hot then?

    You say "everything" is hot - even the mixer? How hot?

  8. #8
    Also, how warm is the room in the morning? When you leave? What sort of cooling and/or ventilation system is there?
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
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  9. #9
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    Here's a simple "non-tech" rule that works well for most electronics. If you touch it and it is too hot to be comfortable to your hand, then the electronics are too hot to be comfortable. Find a way to get them cooler--typically a fan for more are circulation.

    Solid state electronics that are run within the proper temperature will last very long. Excessive heat will cause odd behavior (lock-ups, etc) or can cause permanent damage.

    Look for "heat sinks" (fins like a radiator) and other vents in the case. Make sure these are not blocked at all. Soft surfaces that can block cooling are a bad idea.

    If amplifiers or power supplies are simply "warm to the touch" you have nothing to worry about.

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