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  1. #11
    You have to look at the business side rather than the creative side!!
    It also depends where you are and what others are charging and what other event videographers charge.
    (I do a wedding in Perth for $1899..but in Sydney I could comfortably charge $3000!!!..if you happen to be in country Victoria you might only be able to charge $500!!!) it all depends on the infrastructure and competition!
    You really need to look at your market, look at the competition and then buy gear to suit your market not suit yourself.
    If you want to be creative then buy an Z7 by all means but keep it as your own personal cam!!
    If the market only can handle kiddies birthday parties at $100 a pop then you shoot 'em with a $300 camcorder not a $15000 one. If you start landing corporate promotion videos at $20,000 a shoot then you can buy expensive gear to do the job.

    The important thing is don't over-capitalise and realise too that if are working hard, you often need to replace gear too so factor that in!!

    Chris

  2. #12
    Right on 3rdeye1111, you've got the point. Start small, but complete with what you really need. When you are ready to make a higher purchase, sell your old ones and go for it. Feel free to query if you've any matters you believe any might be of help to.

    I thought it's great to have Chris' inputs here as both of you are Aussies! So contextually and practically, he is able to give very strong advice. Eric has wonderful technical knowledge to tap on. I'm just a rattler. However the rattler would like to add to Chris' comment that you can be creative while being mindful of the business! You've gotta think what's going to attract potential clients to your business, to the extent that they will recommend others to you. It will not only be in what you shoot (unless you are Baz Luhrmann), but also how you approach the very people and occasion itself. That is an art, no doubt.


    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  3. #13
    Quote
    Quote: nagar
    View Post
    When you are ready to make a higher purchase, sell your old ones and go for it
    I would suggest that, if you can afford to, keep one of your older cameras and keep it with you when you're on a shoot (and regularly cycle the battery to keep it operational). It never hurts to have backup, especially for events that only happen once.

    Quote
    Quote: nagar
    View Post
    I'm just a rattler.
    Sometimes the cage needs a good rattling
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  4. #14
    Very good points guys!!
    The unfortunate thing nowdays is that people tend to get smitten by the "technology bug". It's critical to remember that it's not the camera that counts but the person behind the camera!! Just bear in mind that almost ALL DV camcorders (yes, even the domestic ones) will produce a image with a resolution that exceeds the capabilities of a standard TV!! Camera work and lighting are way more important than the technical specs of a camera!! It's easy to produce a really bad video even using an Z7 (I have seen some shockers made on pro gear) and it's also easy to produce a really stunning bit of video with a tiny handycam too!!! A $50,000 camera is not going to cover up your lack of talent as a cameraman!!!

    Chris

  5. #15
    Quote
    Quote: ChrisHarding
    View Post
    and it's also easy to produce a really stunning bit of video with a tiny handycam too!!!
    or even with pixelvision!

    (I agree wholeheartedly)
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

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