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  1. #11
    but if I wanted to add mor lows or mor highs I could use the 9 band eq??
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  2. #12
    Doesn't the mixer have low/high controls on each channel? That's usually a better way. The graphic EQ is intended to do fairly precise adjustment of room acoustics, and anything you do with it affects all channels.

    Just for reference, +4 is a "professional equipment" standard and is 1.23 volts. -10 is a "consumer equipment" standard and is about 0.3 volts. Thus when you feed the output of a conusmer unit with an RCA jack into an input intended for "pro" levels, it will be about 12dB lower than expected - that is, setting the controls normally and looking at a VU meter, you'd get a reading 12dB low.

    Going the other way, feeding the output of a pro unit into a consumer input, the level will be 12dB higher than expected. This is not an unmanageable difference, just a nuisance. It's also not always that bad: the pro-to-consumer interface is also usually a balanced-to-unbalanced interface. The correct way of wiring this, 90% of the time, is to connect one side of the balanced output to the unbalanced input, and leave the other side of the balanced output unconnected. (Do NOT connect it to ground.) This reduces the level discrepancy to 6dB.

    A Mackie mixer would be classified as "pro-sumer," meaning that its line inputs are set up for .3 volt levels and its outputs for 1.23 volt levels. All levels quoted refer to a 0VU reading on the meters.

    More detail, in case you're not already confused enough: the professional standard reference level is 0dBu, which is .78 volts. This strange number is a holdover from the days when everything was 600 ohms. A traditional, mechanical VU meter reads "0" at a level of +4dBu; thus "0VU" is +4dBu, or 1.23 volts. (The meter is not sensitive enough to reach 0VU at .78 volts; besides, broadcasters and movie people like levels to be a bit hot because then long lines are less sensitive to interference.) When you hear somebody say "plus four" think of 1.23 volts.

    The consumer equipment reference is 0dBV, which is 1 volt. 10dB below 1 volt is about 0.32 volt. When you hear somebody say "minus ten" think 0.32 volt.

    TMI?

  3. #13
    Well I just bought the thing so let's see how it is when it come in. I have no idea when it's gonna ship, so I'll get back to yall when it does get here.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  4. #14
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
    View Post
    Doesn't the mixer have low/high controls on each channel? That's usually a better way. The graphic EQ is intended to do fairly precise adjustment of room acoustics, and anything you do with it affects all channels.

    Just for reference, +4 is a "professional equipment" standard and is 1.23 volts. -10 is a "consumer equipment" standard and is about 0.3 volts. Thus when you feed the output of a conusmer unit with an RCA jack into an input intended for "pro" levels, it will be about 12dB lower than expected - that is, setting the controls normally and looking at a VU meter, you'd get a reading 12dB low.

    Going the other way, feeding the output of a pro unit into a consumer input, the level will be 12dB higher than expected. This is not an unmanageable difference, just a nuisance. It's also not always that bad: the pro-to-consumer interface is also usually a balanced-to-unbalanced interface. The correct way of wiring this, 90% of the time, is to connect one side of the balanced output to the unbalanced input, and leave the other side of the balanced output unconnected. (Do NOT connect it to ground.) This reduces the level discrepancy to 6dB.

    A Mackie mixer would be classified as "pro-sumer," meaning that its line inputs are set up for .3 volt levels and its outputs for 1.23 volt levels. All levels quoted refer to a 0VU reading on the meters.

    More detail, in case you're not already confused enough: the professional standard reference level is 0dBu, which is .78 volts. This strange number is a holdover from the days when everything was 600 ohms. A traditional, mechanical VU meter reads "0" at a level of +4dBu; thus "0VU" is +4dBu, or 1.23 volts. (The meter is not sensitive enough to reach 0VU at .78 volts; besides, broadcasters and movie people like levels to be a bit hot because then long lines are less sensitive to interference.) When you hear somebody say "plus four" think of 1.23 volts.

    The consumer equipment reference is 0dBV, which is 1 volt. 10dB below 1 volt is about 0.32 volt. When you hear somebody say "minus ten" think 0.32 volt.

    TMI?
    I have no idea what you are saying, could you try again? Sorry.
    Speaking of room acoostics, how would I go about setting the graphic eq? How would I know where band 1, 2, 3, 4, exetra would go?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  5. #15
    No. Sorry, but I'm pissed off right now.

    Any time a reply takes more than 3 minutes, this board forgets that I'm logged on and blocks me from posting it. Sometimes, in the process of logging on again, I lose the reply.

    I just spent 40 minutes writing a detailed reply to your question, and lost the whole thing. I'm willing to invest this kind of time, but I'm not willing to waste it.

  6. #16
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
    View Post
    No. Sorry, but I'm pissed off right now.

    Any time a reply takes more than 3 minutes, this board forgets that I'm logged on and blocks me from posting it. Sometimes, in the process of logging on again, I lose the reply.

    I just spent 40 minutes writing a detailed reply to your question, and lost the whole thing. I'm willing to invest this kind of time, but I'm not willing to waste it.
    Hi, heres a suggestion. Why don't you type your answer up in word or note pad or what ever and paste it into the reply box?
    Sorry to hear you are having problems. I would write the administrater and let him know about this.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  7. #17
    [removed]
    Last edited by tonsofpcs; 10th Jul 2008 at 17:35. Reason: rm
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  8. #18
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I have never been made aware of such a problem, it's certainly not normal. I do not believe it is a function of this forum but I'll check it out.

    Ivan's suggestion is sound and it's what I always do with any important composition. Never rely on any internet form to retain your information - there are too many things that can go wrong. Even random connection glitches can cause all your text to be lost when you submit it. If you're writing any more than a couple of simple paragraphs, my advice is to always compose the message in Wordpad (or whatever you use) and copy/paste.

    At the very least, always do this before you hit the submit button: Ctrl-A (select all), Ctrl-C (copy). Very simple and it gives you a reasonable backup. I do it every time I submit any form with text - once it becomes a habit you do it without thinking.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  9. #19
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    I've checked it out. So as not to hijack this thread further I've started a new thread on this topic:
    http://www.mediacollege.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4952
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  10. #20
    Ok so anyway, back to my question, how do you set the graphic eq on the mixer to the acoostics of a room?
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

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