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  1. #1
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    Jun 2008
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    Australia
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    Taking a video camera through a highschool...

    Hey guys.
    Soon I shall buy a video camera, and mess with it, I am planning to take my camera through my new highschool next year....for a short film.

    Ok, so it may be illegal to take a video camera through the school.
    thats why I am wondering how to conceal it, and do film work that is at least half decent. I will most likely be taking the Canon HV30, into the school, to capture a whole day of it. I am counting on the fact that no one will be aware of me capturing the day. I am not going to be filming anything private, just a school day.

    Now, I am not very experienced with a video camera, but I have a little experience with still photography. The point of this idea, is to capture the reality of a highschool day, I might actually film a number of days, and take the most interesting footage into a final copy. The things I am worried about are:
    Teachers or students knowing I have a camera.
    Lighting and focusing, since i most likely won't be looking through the viewfinder.
    the battery and the DV tape running out (I can probably take breaks).
    getting the camera damaged in some way (remember its a highschool).

    anyways, sorry for such a long post. just thought I'd plan it out properly.

    thanks guys, suggest all you like. lol.

  2. #2
    It's a government building you are filming in so GET PERMISSION!! If it's a private school then you STILL need permission. In Australia it's illegal to film anyone under 18 unless they are in a public place so be very aware of that!! To be on the safe side I would get parent's permission in writing from each and every student under 18 that you are likely to film in the school which is not considered a public place by law!!

    If you want to conduct a covert operation then you must take your chances and maybe buy a little used $100 camcorder but you are REALLY taking a HUGE risk and could quite easily be arrested AND expelled!!!

    If you approach the head and submit a good idea that doesn't violate any laws then the staff just might give you more assistance than you realise!!

    Chris

  3. #3
    Member
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    lol, yeah I know that.....I thought of asking, but after a while I just thought why bother, because they usually turn down something, that could possibly show that their staff isn't teaching properly. The point of my project is to be as guerilla as possible, I realise the law, and I will soon read up on that stuff.

    but yeah, either way I will be filming....either way I need to know how to conceal it, because the film and media class students all have to sign permission for footage to be taken. so I can do that within the law.

    honestly, if I don't shoot the school I can easily go into the city and shoot some footage of funny people, or stuff that happens, lol....gotta love candid shots.

    thanks

  4. #4
    Ok, but before you start shooting like crazy you need to know the law!!

    Try this link that's applicable for NSW (and most other states too) and read the content carefully. The author is a photographer AND a lawyer!!

    http://4020.net/words/photorights.php

    If you know your rights then you won't get into trouble

    Chris

  5. #5
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I'm with Chris. Learn how to do this sort of thing properly and everything will work out much better. You can still shoot discreetly so you capture candid footage, but don't break the law to do it.

    If nothing else, think of your long-term future. If you get offside with your teachers and peers over one project, what are you going to do next year when you have an even better idea that requires their help? They will always remember you as the guy who filmed them without permission and you're unlikely to get their support. Your reputation will follow you long after you leave school as well.

    If you're serious about this, start out on the right path, learn about ethics and the law, and get it right. All the best.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  6. #6
    12 years ago, I witnessed a suicide. Feeling a gut of journalistic spirit, I rushed home (scene of incident was only a block away from home), grabbed my Nikon FM2, loaded it and began snapping away. From police cars.. to the loved one of the dead mourning. In the midst of the heat, I was spotted by a policeman, who demanded for some form of ID that authorised my presence and my snapping... Obviously I had none.

    What you are about to do is not as crazy as me, but at its root, the same.

    Asking for permission stating your position and intention will not compromise any form of breaking the 'naturalism' in the environment. Carrying a $50,000 camera with a full crew will.

    Laws are meant to liberate, not restraint. Do think it over.

    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  7. #7
    Quote
    Quote: nagar
    View Post

    Asking for permission stating your position and intention will not compromise any form of breaking the 'naturalism' in the environment.
    Apologies, I believe 'realism' is a more accurate word to use... not 'naturalism'.
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  8. #8
    Member
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    yeah I guess, I will have to ask, and if they don't agree, I might do some footage down town instead.....I read the laws, and it says you can film anyone just as long as its not used for comercial stuff.

    thanks

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