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  1. #11
    No argument there. The thing is, manufacturers could just as easily build power limiters into their amps, matched to the speakers, and be absolutely sure the user couldn't blow them out.

    Here's where the conundrum comes in. (Oooh, I got to use a big word!) Real music has a peak-to-average ratio of at least 10dB, or a 10:1 power ratio. Real speakers have a peak power to continuous power handling capability of at least 2:1 and often 4:1. That means you ought to be able to run a 100W-continuous speaker at an average of 40W, with peaks to 400W, safely. Which implies a 400W-continuous amp.

    But woe to the person who actually connects a 400W amp to a 100W speaker! Somebody's going to drop a mic on the floor, clip the amp, put an 800W spike into the speaker, and blow it up. So to be safe, you'd need to have a 400W speaker and run it far below capacity most of the time.

    Powered speakers with amps and limiting circuitry designed for the specific speakers should be able to simultaneously make better use of the speakers' capabilities and eliminate the danger of overload. Maybe the JBL unit doesn't have power limiting, in which case I can see why they did what they did. I looked up the specs and didn't find anything on power limiting circuitry.

    So this is really a complicated issue. And the discussion has gotten away from Ivan's original question. How big an amp is the right amp? Who knows? It depends. But the safest course, I assume Bassred and I agree on this, is to use an amp with a continuous power rating in the same range as the continuous rating of the speaker. Mount the amp where you can see it, so if the clip lights go on you'll know.

    This last won't work for a blind person, of course. What really needs to happen is to put a limiter in the signal chain so you can't overdrive the amp, even on purpose.

    (By the way, "RMS power" is an oxymoron, but everybody says it.)

  2. #12
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
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    This last won't work for a blind person, of course. What really needs to happen is to put a limiter in the signal chain so you can't overdrive the amp, even on purpose.
    How would you go about putting a limiter in? How much do they caust? Would it be ezeyer just to get a pare of powered speakers? You don't see them often, though. I haven't seen them often, anyway.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  3. #13
    Quote
    Quote: ivan
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    How would you go about putting a limiter in? How much do they caust? Would it be ezeyer just to get a pare of powered speakers? You don't see them often, though. I haven't seen them often, anyway.
    A limiter should be a couple of hundred bucks or less. Very much worth it, not only when you think of what blown speakers cost to fix, but also the aggravation of having them go out in the middle of a service, and taking them down and getting repaired. In your case, I think you'd have to have somebody else set it up for you, since all the parameters are going to be on an LCD readout.

    I haven't seen nearly as many powered speakers yet as I expected to, other than studio monitors. I'm still convinced it's the coming thing. There are great advantages in addition to the speaker protection thing.

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