Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    QUEENLAND
    Posts
    1

    CHROMA KEYSet up

    any guru try setting up a chroma studio before.??/
    i am trying to set a chroma studio to film my company 10 anniversary .
    Was task by my boss .anyone can help??
    thks.

  2. #2
    Hi Royal

    Essentially you need a green backdrop, even lighting and an editor that will be able to key out the green content.

    I just bought some nice green fabric from the local shop that they use to make high visibility garments with. It keys out perfectly. Light the backdrop as evenly as you can and keep the subjects as far away as practical from the backdrop as you can to prevent light spill.

    What else do you want to know...specific questions are easier to answer!!

    Chris

  3. #3
    Quote
    Quote: ChrisHarding
    View Post
    I just bought some nice green fabric from the local shop that they use to make high visibility garments with.
    Interesting, never thought of just going to a clothing fabric shop, I was always looking in hardware stores and drapery stores. Good idea (I'll have to check one out)
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  4. #4
    I did the same, but I bought blue cloth instead (yup the 'older' days) and had the shop owner sew them all into a big blue screen. It's usually folded in a cardboard box and when we need to use it, take it out, iron it, clip it up on our artificial ceilings with all the lightings and whoala, blue (or green) screen!
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  5. #5
    nagar: Have you tried rolling the screen up on a bar (or pipe or broomstick or other dowel) and simply tie the rolled screen up with some short rope (or tie/trick line if you have some)?
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  6. #6
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Te Awamutu, New Zealand
    Posts
    3,959
    Blog Entries
    79
    One thing to keep in mind if you buy fabric is how prone it is to wrinkles. I once bought some material that was a nice green but became wrinkled if you sneezed at it, and it was a real pain to iron. I ended up buying some cheap greenscreen material online. It wasn't actually that much more expensive than the fabric. It's certainly not a "real" greenscreen but it works surprisingly well.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  7. #7
    Just for interest guys
    If you are shooting outdoors or with very even and non-direct light, a roll of plastic tablecloth works well. I have a 30m roll of bright green which cost under $20. However direct light on it causes hotspots!!!

    When you go into the fabric store, unroll some fabric and "ball it up" if it doesn't crease then you have a winner. My fabric is virtually crease free but the weave is quite coarse. I roll mine up on a cardboard core so there are no permanent folds but my "semi-permanent" screen sits in the spare bedroom and the fabric is stretched and stapled onto a timber frame so there is no chance at all of any creases.

    Chris

  8. #8
    Thanks for the tip Eric. Will try that when I am able to. We seldom do chroma-keying nowadays, so blue cloth stays where she is. I am still in the process of planning to 're-arrange' the layout of the office I work in due to a change in staff strength and incoming equipment purchases. Maybe that will be the time...
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube