Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1

    Zeroing the Mixing Board?

    I know there is a method but can't remenber the order I need to reset a church sound system starting with the amps and working back to Main-subsX4 - individual chan./Monitor Adjusts

  2. #2
    Depends on what you are talking about (more specifically..)

    Zeroing the board is what a kind audio tech does on rented gear by resetting everything to -0-... turning all the knobs and faders down....

    If you are talking about gain structure, that is something different altogether. if that's the case, try this:

    hit the 'PFL' or 'SOLO' button on the channel (you'll follow this the same way for all the channels.)

    Have the input source (singer, instrument, playback device) going at it's performance level, so make sure drummers hitting hard as he will while playing the show, make sure singers aren't just talking into their mics.....
    and watch the meter, raise or lower the gain knob on the channel so that the input is reaching -0- at peaks... +3 on peaks is OK too, depending on how dynamic the input source is.... but for this example lets stick to -0-....

    Now that you've got all of your inputs coming into the board with a nominal signal, set your aux sends (monitors or FX).. start by turning the main aux level to -0- (should be marked some how, though may not say '0').. now set your primary channels to the nominal '-0-' setting on the aux knob on the channel strip.... if you know the rough settings of the monitor mix go ahead and dial them somewhat, but you'll have more time for that later..

    turn on the monitor amps, turn the attenuators (those knobs on the front that aren't 'Volume' knobs in the traditional sense and that {despite much discussion} DO NOT need to be set all the way up) up so that the primary channels needed in those monitors are just a little too loud for the performers...

    now go turn the main aux level down to suit the performers, now you've got some headroom should they ask for a little more volume than they initially thought they needed...

    Now for the mains... you can dial in a mix if you have performers there, or set up a CD player, set the input to -0- at peaks and set your channel fader to -0- or nominal then set your master output faders on the mixer to -0- or nominal...

    Go turn on the power amps for the mains, adjust the attenuators so that the overall volume is a bit too loud...

    Now you should have some headroom so if you need things just a hair louder than you normally have them, you are ready for it.. ...

    this is just a start, and your use of the rig is going to determine how much headroom you should give yourself (for example, installations may set up with a little less overall headroom because they are typically going to go for the same levels most of the time...... A festival-style live gig outdoors may set the rig up with a lot of headroom to account for the changing conditions of the venue, and the differing acts or performers they may have...

    the name of the game is headroom, you should be able to turn your rig up more than you like it without sending any of your signals out too hot, or without risking having your amps clip which may damage speakers...

    make sure your amps have clip limiters and use them , set appropriate low-cuts so (even if you have dedicated x-over-amps and subs) you aren't wasting power trying to recreate frequencies that are not going to be reproduced by you system very efficiently anyway....

    and make sure you aren't cranking everything..... it is not always necessary...

    Hope this helps (either the short answer or the long one)..... I'll check back in a few days to see if there are any questions...

  3. #3

    Long answer was just what I needed

    Long answer was just what I was looking for thank you we went over it in a class once but I couldn't recall any of it when I needed it You are greatly appreciated God Bless You!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube