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  1. #1

    Help - what camera to buy?

    I'm relatively new to digital camera technology and photography in general, and am currently dabbling as a hobby. My primary project types at this time are people & "portrait" style, and "still-life" like interesting buildings, fauna (macro), etc. I want to get an SLR package, and I know that there is no way I can make an informed decision with my limited experience - I don't know enough detail on anything to make sense of my research. So I want to ask an expert - please give me your recommendations. I know I should basically buy a name brand, and spend the most I possibly can to have quality equipment. So what would be in the $1000 to $1500 range for body, best all-purpose lens (if there is such a thing) or the two "must have" lenses, and flash? For example, I found a Canon EOS 40D body for $550 & Canon 580EX II Speedlite Flash for $380, and Canon Canon Zoom Wide Angle-Telephoto EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Image Stabilizer USM Lens for $240, & Canon 50mm f/2.5 EF Macro Autofocus Lens - would make total for body, flash & 2 lenses near top of my range at $1410. And no, I don't have lots of money - I'm spending more than I should because I want to, so I want to get the best I can. Please help with your recommendations!

  2. #2
    Quote
    Quote: curlyspermanentwave
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    I...Canon EOS 40D body for $550 & Canon 580EX II Speedlite Flash for $380, and Canon Canon Zoom Wide Angle-Telephoto EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Image Stabilizer USM Lens for $240, & Canon 50mm f/2.5 EF Macro Autofocus Lens - would make total for body, flash & 2 lenses near top of my range at $1410...
    Hmm.. that sounds way too cheap even if you are buying a used 40D body... are you talking about a 400D?? The rest of the stuff you've mentioned are much lower than their MRSP, but a little more believable... It sounds like a kit for a pro-sumer than a beginner.
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  3. #3
    Do realize that some manufacturers interfaces are easier to use than others for certain settings. If you plan on learning, I suggest getting a camera system that provides easy access (preferably physical) to most manual settings (shutter speed, iris, focus, and possibly zoom) as well as at least aperture-priority (and possibly shutter priority) exposure.
    Eric Adler (tonsofpcs)
    http://www.videoproductionsupport.com/ Chat at: http://tinyurl.com/vpschat
    Follow me on twitter: @videosupport @eric_adler

  4. #4
    curlyspermanentwave, I recommend you to buy this one: sony-dsc-h50
    Very nice digital camera with 9.1 megapixels and 15x optical zoom.
    More than that in cost $344 only, so seems to be a good deal for Sony DSC-H50

  5. #5

    Name Brand all the way

    Make sure you go with any name brand, Cannon, Fuji, etc. they not only offer the best warranties, but also the best customer service & technical support, which is always goos to have. Also the extended warranty will be there if you need it. Also spend the money up front, so you don't have to buy another one in a year because this one does not have all the gadgets. In the long run you will save alot.
    Good Luck
    http://www.printit4less.com

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