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  1. #1
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    stage mic advice

    Hello to all

    I'm doing a recital in a high school next month am making sure I know what I'm doing...

    Since your a pro I'd like an opinion on micing the stage. The acts are valet and tap routines and the the girl I'm doing it for is specific that tap audio is a big sell with the parents;
    That said I'm looking at Electrovoice 635a which is a cheap ENG that I read somewhere is not bad for stage mic. Am thinking one near the house speakers should suffice.

    And for the tap I'm thinking an inexpensive 'pressure zone' like the Crown Sound Grabber II PZM. They are 130.00 US for two and I thought It would be nice to set these right on the stage floor 1/3 of the distance apart.

    What say U



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  2. #2
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    Yes, I think boundary mics may be used for tap dancing. My only concern is how to isolate the boundary mics. Provide good rubber footing or soft foam might do the trick. Hope this may help you.

  3. #3
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    Quote
    Quote: aganchinges
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    Yes, I think boundary mics may be used for tap dancing. My only concern is how to isolate the boundary mics. Provide good rubber footing or soft foam might do the trick. Hope this may help you.
    Can I lay thin foam materiel and tape the two to the floor ???

  4. #4
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    frequency response

    referring to the frequency response of a mic which is better ???
    40 to 15,000 or 80 to 13,000 Hz

    If I'm learning, then I'd say the first is probably what I want because I'd guess it's sensitive to sound sooner and goes higher before it clips the sound.

    Don't laugh I'm a NuBB and I said I was guessing....

  5. #5
    In sorta reverse order:

    Frequency response has nothing to do with clipping. Frankly, there are so many variables that a simple set of numbers for frequency response is almost useless, even if frequency response is really what you're interested in. I wouldn't even bother looking. Other factors are more important.

    The 635 is an excellent and rugged mic, but it's the wrong one unless the performers are right on top of it. It has an omnidirectional pickup pattern, which means its sensitivity is equal in all directions. From a distance, it will not pick up as much of the desired sound as you want, and it will pick up everything else, including feedback. What, specifically, do you want this mic to pick up? You said "valet" (ballet?) and tap dancing - I assume there's music, where is that coming from? I would guess that you want a mic that's as directional as possible.

    A pressure zone mic on the stage is great for picking up tap. As a matter of fact, one of its drawbacks is that it tends to pick up the sound of people walking, which is normally undesirable. You don't have to buy a mic to do this; any mic laid on the stage will exhibit the PZM effect, which is a significant (6dB) increase in sensitivity. If you stick the mic right at the edge of the stage, so there is no stage behind it (toward the audience) it will have a directional characteristic which makes it more sensitive to sounds coming from the stage, which is what you want. Don't worry too much about microphone specs; at that distance from the tap dancers, the acoustic environment of the stage is going to have a far greater effect on the sound than mic characteristics. You do want to lay the mic on a scrap of fabric or something, so it won't rattle against the floor. This will have almost no effect on the sound.

    Above all, try everything out first! Don't wait for the day of the show. If something is broken or incompatible with something else, you're out of luck.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Karl

    Was curious about frequency, thnx..

    As for the 635 I had it in mind to set that on a stand near the house speakers to capture music not the tap numbers. This is because I'm anticipating the equipment at the school to be less that professional and probably not be able to hook in a board feed.
    The pressure zone I thought would be a a good solution for the tap shoes on stage but glad you warned me about all the unwanted potential for garbage sounds.

    Your suggestion about laying a mic towards the dancers is going to be the plan. You suggested not to lay it on bare floor which makes sense and I have plenty of foam I can use bit what if I just use a boom style mic stand set very close to the floor and so that, as of the tail end of mic at the start of the XLR is right at the edge.
    Will that work OK ????

  7. #7
    Gotcha. Foam under the floor mic will work, as long as you don't use too big a piece. The PZM effect depends on having the mic against or near a hard surface. If you use foam that's just barely big enough for the mic to sit on, fine. Don't use thick foam, as the farther you get from the floor the worse problems you'll have with high frequency response. A boom placing the mic near the floor also works.

    I see what you're saying about the 635, which is probably as good as anything for picking up sound from the speakers. But that's a lousy way to do it; if at all possible, find a direct place to tap in. The quality will be hugely better.

    Have you bought the 635? Otherwise you might consider a cheap omni condenser mic with battery power. Condenser mics are almost always better than dynamics at a given price; you could pick something up for under $50.

    Trivia: they had condenser mics in the 1920s that were flat to at least 10khz.

  8. #8
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    Trivia: they had condenser mics in the 1920s that were flat to at least 10khz.[/QUOTE]

    That's Total Audio Geekiness right there!! Yes it is amazing how much has been accomplished in the last 200 years compared to all of history. In my opinion (dumb Puerto Rican from the Bronx,,, don't pay no mind) I'd say 'Combustion, electricity, and transporting Sound on a wire most likely helped to accelerate this progress like nothing else...
    JMHO


    thanks for your input. I'll be at the dance school tomorrow to get a few rough grabs and get some idea how this will work out. Am planning on gettrng to the actual venie with a few tap kids and get to know what's there in terms of audio boards and potential for a feed and such.
    Give me your thoughts on Shure SM58 for capturing the tap number...

    thnx
    Last edited by eofeapr; 19th Aug 2008 at 15:24.

  9. #9
    SM58 is fine. Whatever you use, you'll have to turn the bass way down or it'll sound like they've got concrete blocks on their feet.

  10. #10
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
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    SM58 is fine. Whatever you use, you'll have to turn the bass way down or it'll sound like they've got concrete blocks on their feet.
    I work for the City of North Las Vegas as one of my audio gigs...and one of our great community events had 4 groups of tappers.. the little old lady asked if I was going to mic it, it seemed reasonable (although they were tapping plenty loud...) so I threw a 58 on one of my work gloves right
    between the two front wedges (and did not put it through those wedges..) and it worked great! I had 4 very happy tapp schools...

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