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Thread: Mixer to Amps

  1. #1

    Mixer to Amps

    Hi All,

    Have been reading through the forum and some great stuff posted.

    Bit about me, I’m in the process of setting up a night club, and I have taken it upon myself to setup and run the light & sound systems. It was my thought that as I was a mobile DJ some 15 years ago with my duel channel mixer, 2 speakers and 2 lights, I thought how difficult can this be……………………….well needless to say I have thrown myself in the deep end realised how much of a novice I really am. So having bought all the equipment I thought I needed, am now getting close to installation and I have come across my first query……………………..so here goes with possibly a major embarrassing question.

    Have purchased a RTCIK MX-16, along with 6 x 400w Speakers with 3 Amps & 6 x 600w speakers with 3 Amps………………….so far so good. Having started to look at the Mixer Output……….i’m now thinking one left output and one right output in to 6 amps????.

    so the Question is: how do I connect my one output channel to my six amps (12 speakers)??? or have I not bought something that I should have and if so what is it.

    Your greatfully…………The Drowning Mixer

  2. #2
    You're not going to believe this, but you can probably just go ahead and parallel all the inputs.

    Most mixers nowadays will drive any load that's 600 ohms or higher. Most amps have an input of 5,000 ohms or higher. Six 5,000 ohm loads is a bit over 800 ohms.

    So the question is, can your mixer drive a 600-ohm load? You're going to have to look up the specs. Cheap mixers sometimes can't. Also it's worth looking up the input impedance of the amps.

  3. #3
    Thanks for your reply............

    ..........on the back of my Amps I have Stereo, Parallel and Bridge Mode,
    is this what I have to set on? and if I understand correctly is it a case of one amp being the master - being plugged into the Mixer and then the next amp plugs into the master amp and so on and so on????

    If this is correct, then how do I control the volume of each speaker set.......or will they all be dictated to by the master speakers???

  4. #4
    I don't think you'll have to much control over speaker output, you'll just have the mixer, I think.
    Regards,
    Ivan Fegundez. Recording Technician, live sound technician, and mastering technician.

  5. #5
    No, you don't want to daisy-chain the amps, that just means the distortion from each amp (there's always some) adds. Parallel the mixer outputs to the amplifiers.

    Assuming you're running stereo, the Left output of the mixer gets fed in parallel to the Left inputs of all the amps. Ditto with the Right outputs and inputs. Set the amps to Stereo. Put a program thru the mixer and adjust the knobs so you get a reasonable reading on the meters. Then adjust the levels on each amp to get the amount of noise you want.

    You still have to look up the equipment specs. The mixer must be able to drive a 600-ohm load.

  6. #6
    Karl,

    Thanks a million……………….Ok!! in laymens terms how do I connect 6 amp cables into 1 mixer output plug…be it a 3 pin XLR Balanced connection or a ¼’’ Jack (unbalanced) which is what I have on my mixer.

    Is there some type of splitter I should be using?? If so where on the internet could a buy, or is there any other simpler way of doing it

  7. #7
    I'm going to assume you have balanced XLR connectors on the amps. The general rule with balanced inputs is: even if you're coming from an unbalanced signal source, wire it up as if it were balanced.

    So: You said "daisy chain," which I took to mean running the output of one amp into the input of another. But you may have meant something else, in which case you were right: prepare 5 short lengths of shielded-pair cable (two wires in a shield) to loop from amp to amp, and a sixth to go from the mixer to the amps. Wire them to the XLR connectors in a parallel chain, like outdoor Christmas lights. Shields to pin 1 of each XLR, one color wire to pins 2, the other color wire to pins 3. At the mixer, connect one of the wires to the 1/4" plug's tip and the other wire and shield to the sleeve.

    It's the same as AC wiring: the wire goes from outlet to outlet, and you can plug in appliances at each point. The only caution is that you don't plug in more appliances than the circuit can handle. Same with audio; you have to be sure the combined load impedance of all those amps isn't lower than what the mixer can drive.

  8. #8
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
    View Post
    I'm going to assume you have balanced XLR connectors on the amps. The general rule with balanced inputs is: even if you're coming from an unbalanced signal source, wire it up as if it were balanced.

    So: You said "daisy chain," which I took to mean running the output of one amp into the input of another. But you may have meant something else, in which case you were right: prepare 5 short lengths of shielded-pair cable (two wires in a shield) to loop from amp to amp, and a sixth to go from the mixer to the amps. Wire them to the XLR connectors in a parallel chain, like outdoor Christmas lights. Shields to pin 1 of each XLR, one color wire to pins 2, the other color wire to pins 3. At the mixer, connect one of the wires to the 1/4" plug's tip and the other wire and shield to the sleeve.

    It's the same as AC wiring: the wire goes from outlet to outlet, and you can plug in appliances at each point. The only caution is that you don't plug in more appliances than the circuit can handle. Same with audio; you have to be sure the combined load impedance of all those amps isn't lower than what the mixer can drive.
    Glad you put that in, I've seen it happen and throw guys for a loop... I've also seen stacks of many amps run off one send from the board without issue...

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