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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Pendleton, OR USA
    Posts
    8

    Loudspeaker Placement & Need for Sub?

    Greetings All - I am looking for advice on how to configure the loudspeakers for our church sanctuary.

    The room is 50' deep, by 60' wide. It is all sheetrock, with a suspended drop ceiling (acoustic tile). The ceiling is vaulted, with the center at appx 25 ft, coming down to appx 10 ft at the sides, and the ridgeline runs front to back, not side to side. It is carpeted, and has padded, upholstered chairs.

    The stage is 12ft deep, by 36ft wide, backed up to the wall, w/ 3 wedge monitors. Musicians/singers are spread all across it.

    Currently, for mains, we are using two Mackie SRM450s. Here is the problem:

    They are placed in the corners of the room, parallel to the back of the stage, on stands appx 6ft from floor to bottom of speaker. So when someone is standing on the front part of the stage, they are actually in front of the loudspeakers. This usually does not cause too many problems, until someone (usually a guest speaker, etc.) is wearing a lapel mic, and likes to speak from the floor, rather than the stage. (Hello feedback!) Our Pastor uses a Countryman E6i headworn mic for speaking, or a handheld wireless mic, both of which work great.

    One issue we have trouble with is that the house mix and monitor mix compete, especially because (I think) of the speaker placement. I spoke with an audio engineer from a larger church, who had more experience than I, and he suggested flying the 450's more in front of the stage, and putting a sub on the floor, next to and at the rear of the stage.

    I was thinking of first flying the speakers we have, w/out the sub, with the addition of one more 450, flown at the ridgeline of the room, with the other two positioned at equal distance from the ridgeline to the wall, for max audience coverage.

    Any thoughts are appreciated, especially on the issue of needing a sub or not,and the positioning of the speakers.

    I hope I have given enough info (and not too much!), but if not I would be glad to provide more details.

    Thanks in advance,

    Justin Russell

    Multimedia Director
    Living Word Christian Center
    Pendleton, OR

  2. #2
    Add up all the sound sources that produce low bass, and consider whether they can produce enough by themselves not to need further amplification. You'll be well ahead if you can do without the sub.

    Flying the speakers is a good idea. My fave has always been the central cluster, with the speakers splayed out so their patterns overlap as little as possible.

    Just for reference: the lowest note of a bass guitar is 40Hz; of organ, 32Hz. (Some organs go down to 16Hz, but it is completely unrealistic to expect the sound system to handle that.) Lead or backup guitar, 80Hz. Drums, 100Hz except the kick drum which is 50Hz. Piano or electric piano, if 61 keys, 64Hz. If 88 keys the lowest note is about 28Hz but it's all harmonics so a system good to 50Hz will do fine. Synth: most voices, 64Hz; special low-freq voices, maybe 32Hz. Human voice, 80Hz at the lowest.

    The Mackie spkrs are good to 55Hz, which is low A on a bass guitar. If you engage the Mackie low frequency filter, the speaker will start to cut out below 75Hz which is low enough to handle low E on a lead or backup guitar.

    Summary: what must you send thru the Mackies and what can stand on its own? The answer will determine whether you need a sub.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Smith Center, KS
    Posts
    1
    You need to consider your audience. What kind of sound presure levels are you talking about. What kind of music? How many parishoners ususally at your services. More people will suck up the sound. Sub placement is not important as sub freq's are non directional. Flat wall behind the monitors? Try moving monitors around to see if you can stop them from reflecting into house mix. Sound absorbant material with or without curtains for astetics and placment not paralell to the back wall sometimes help. The SRM450s need to be front of stage. Flying the pair at center V works well in many sanctuarys. You might be suprised how much easier to mix front of house in the flying V 8-10' in front of stage. Then find someone with an analyzer and set the Front of house EQ and leave it there.

    Here are some other ideas I found on speaker placement that may be a bit more indepth in this article:
    http://www.sogospellovers.com/forums...ead.php?t=4544

    Good luck, have fun, empower your paritioners in your efforts. God be praised in all you do.

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Pendleton, OR USA
    Posts
    8
    Thanks for the responses, they are very helpful. This info gives me a place to start, and I will experiment from there.

    Thanks again -

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