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  1. #11
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I don't have time to get into this in detail but I'd like to quickly stick up for Dreamweaver. Mainly I want to address the argument between WYSIWYG and hand-coding. They both have their place but to me the argument is a red herring. You don't need to choose between them - you can use both or either as required. I have DW set up on dual monitors with one monitor showing a WYSIWYG view and all the palettes, while the second monitor shows only the HTML (code inspector). About 80% of my work is in the code inspector - it's easy to work with and has the common features of good text editors including color-coding and stuff like code hints (if you're into that).

    As well as having a nice text editor, DW provides a real-time preview as I work (the WYSIWYG palette) and heaps of handy tools like folder synchronization, link-checking, server testing, quick image editing, code debugging, etc. Sure there are plenty of features I'd never use but I don't mind that - it's worth a bit of bloat to have so many tools in one package.

    So what I'm saying is that just because someone uses DW doesn't mean they rely on WYSIWYG. There are plenty of other reasons to use it.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  2. #12
    So dave you use DW? I usually find sites designed using such editors to be table based, and sometimes using non-breaking spaces for layout, having fixed width+font sizes, and as such less flexible. Not to mention missing doctypes, use of deprecated attributes and elements. Etc.

    I'm aware that some of it mey be due to missuse of the editor, I.e. Beginners who download/buy the editor witout knowing how to use it properly, but it would seam thet those are actually selling their web-design services.


    Finally Adobes software seams to be largely overpriced, you said it yourself, spend most time in source view. Well just above $400+ with delivery seams like an awfully waste of money for something when you can get same features for free.

    Atleast i wouldn't consider buying DW when same features are available by using a combination of free alternatives.

    The only thing i may buy at some point would be Flash Professional, but i sure don't like their pricing, because i know its overpriced.

  3. #13
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Things have come a long way. DW is very much about CSS. Doc types are handled fine and you have full control. The main thing is to spend a bit of time when you first install it making sure any code-rewriting options are disabled. Once that's done you're pretty safe to code away.

    There are lots of good things about DW. If you haven't used it for a while you might be pleasantly surprised, although it might take a while to find all the cool stuff. I also have to be honest and say I'm not a fast typer and there are certain tasks I just can't do as fast hand-coding as I can in WYSIWYG. You get to see the HTML being generated as you go so it's fine - it's not often that I have to correct anything.

    In my case I underuse the features but the price isn't really an issue because I have Adobe Master Collection - I get DW anyway so I might as well use it
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  4. #14
    tbh the only thing i like about dreamweaver is when your typing and it comes up with a suggestion. things i hate. the whole look and feel of things. i liked it when it was made by macromedia.

  5. #15
    Quote
    Quote: MohsinAbbas
    View Post
    any one can help me with finding online web design courses.
    Yes Mohsin Abbas, W3Schools.com is a decent place to get start with HTML learning; then as you know, you are on your own.

    I suggest you not to get involved in a software debate because at this time all you need is to know what you are facing with, making necessary algorithmic arrangements, putting the page elemens in an order on a white paper with your pencil and a rubber eraser, then your imagination of the visuals, and thinking of any further functionality as if you are going out shopping for them.

    If you can't do this much, forget about HTML, it would turn out to be the world of hurt to you.

    By the way, have you tried a Google search on the keywords " online web design course " - because I've just made one.

    best regards;
    Last edited by kunter; 28th Nov 2008 at 15:14.
    - kunter ilalan web designer
    follow him on twitter and on MediaCollege

  6. #16
    for online web design courses go here..................
    http://www.worldwidelearn.com/online...gn-courses.htm

  7. #17

    WYSIWYG is short for...

    Chelsea Goose,

    WYSIWYG is short for 'What You See Is What You Get' and it covers a category of webpage editors (Dreamweaver eg.) that provide a visual of the editing that's being done on the site and the way it will appear on the browser, as opposed to the way site editing used to be managed before (exclusively by code). So now it's more intuitive to handle, capturing a broader range of people out there interested in creating sites.

  8. #18
    W3schools provides users full web building tutorials.They also offer an Online Certification Program like The HTML Certificate.

  9. #19
    New Member
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    w3schools is a good resource website for learning web development.

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