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  1. #1
    Jack Hallows
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    Football Highlights

    hi im Jack hallows and im a student a brooksby melton college in england. for my final major project in media (moving image) i have been given the task of filming a sunday league soccer team and put titles, commentary and other things over the top of it to make it look like a match on sky sports or another sports channel. i am currently researching into different things that are used professionally in this field of work. i was just wondering if you could give me information on how player cams work during a match (camera follows a player for a certain amount of time). if you could tell me a link also that would be helpful
    Thanks
    Jack Hallows (student at Brooksby Melton College)

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Hi Jack,

    You're a bit too early - as it happens one of the tutorials I'm working on is how outside broadcasts work. It's probably worth a look but it doesn't have much useful information yet.

    Anyway.....

    Most field sports rely on two cameras at the halfway line - usually positioned in or on top of the grandstand. One camera will maintain a fairly wide shot while the other concentrates on tighter shots. The wide shot is used for showing player positions, long passes, etc. This shot might include about a quarter of the playing field. The camera operator doesn't do a lot of zooming - they spend a lot of time gently panning left and right.

    The tight shot is used for showing the close-up action, especially tackles and other confrontions. This camera operator tends to work a lot more, having to zoom and follow the action much more vigourously.

    The best way to see how this works is to watch a soccer game and notice how these two shots are cut. Once you can imagine the two camera operators (one doing the wide and one doing the tight) then it becomes easier to see how it works.

    The next most important cameras tend to be mobile cameras on the sideline (hand-held, shoulder mounted or steadicam). These can be used for a different angle and are especially good for throw-ins etc.

    Other cameras could concentrate on the goals and other areas. A big OB unit would even have cameras flying overhead, in the dressing rooms, etc.

    Hope this helps. I'm not a soccer specialist but I've done a bit of rugby and the general format is the same. Let me know if you have any more questions. It would also be good to hear how the project goes. Good luck.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
    Jack Hallows
    Guest

    Football Highlights

    have anyone got any information on how to make the graphics that are used during a live Sky sports soccer match or another sports channel. e.g. team sheets (team line-ups), scoreboard, stats and facts etc... If anyone has some information concerning this it would be greatly appreciated.
    Cheers

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Have a look at www.chyron.com. This is what the channel I work for uses.

    Another oldie but goodie is www.scala.com. I used to use this back in my Amiga days and it was very popular for sports broadcasting. I don't know much about it these days though - I gave up on Scala after my Amiga became obsolete.

    Of course, for those working in post-production on a limited budget, there's not a lot wrong with making graphics in Photoshop with a transparent background.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

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