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  1. #1

    DVD Authoring Query

    This may be an odd thing to ask but has been bugging me for some time.

    When creating dvds from a shot, edited and encoded project, often, depending on the project size, I find there is either not enough space on the dvd to create the final dvd project (not a prob as I either use a dual layer or create a 2 disc project), or there is loads of space left on the disc. Now I think having created a professional dvd project and having that ugly look of a half used dvd when you look at the burnt side lets down the pro look of the said project. When you buy dvd movies etc from the store you never see this. How can I use the entire dvd disc space for a project that is smaller than the disc size without filling the disc with unnecessary files?

    Thanks

    Tom Scott

  2. #2
    Hi Tom

    Commercial DVD's use a glass master and are pressed not burnt so you don't get the blue/purple dye on the disk. Hence the professional look.

    I often send clients out short clips that might only take 200mb of a 4.7GB DVD and they have never said anything!! I guess you could increase the bitrate so it uses more space but that seems silly.

    It's best just to make the topside of the DVD look good with some fancy printing and 99% of users will not even look at the bottom!!

    Unless you want to go for a glass master (which will cost you a fortune just to press one or two disks) then it's best to just live with the amateur look of a "non-commercial" DVD

    Chris

  3. #3
    Thank you very much, I did not know there was a method of creating dvds that didn't leave this burnt mark on the disc. So essentially some of the glass mastered discs could only be half used, you just can't see it, is this right?
    Well thanks anyhow, and yeah I do like creating sleek looks to the label side and people are usually pleased with what I do.

    Many thanks Chris

    Tom

  4. #4
    Hi Tom

    Pressing DVD's (like pressing vinyl records in the old days) is a lot quicker obviously when a video/music company needs to release 100,000 disks!! The glass master is naturally expensive but when doing huge quantities the cost comes down to almost nothing (per disk) as the disk is made in seconds. The same principle is used in plastic moulding..the tool mould may cost $10,000 but the cost is offset when you make millions of items

    I actually noticed that the CD blanks I'm using now are almost invisible when burnt but the blueish/purple dye in DVD's shows up the burnt area easily. However I haven't had anyone comment about why the underside of their DVD is blue??? I really have no idea why DVD's need the dark coloured dye and CD's don't. Does anyone know why??

    Chris

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