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  1. #1
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    New to Pro-Sound

    Hi Guys,

    I am new to pro-sound and this forum, basically i want to know what is the best way to start Pro-Sound study or designs, any books recommended or Any guide to design Pro-Sound, Mostly for live events and Audituriums?

    Any recommended settings for Mixer,DSP,Amplifier,Speaker connections?

    Please help in this regards as i am about to start working on Pro-Sound systems.

  2. #2
    I seem to be first, I assume others will add their favorites.

    Best starter book I know, and less expensive than many: Sound Reinforcement Handbook by Gary Davis and Ralph Jones, second edition. Published by Hal Leonard. Written for Yamaha. I don't know if it's currently in print, but there are always copies on Ebay and Amazon.

  3. #3
    I like Karls pick, for sure. And, Yamaha, Shure, Electovoice, Rane, (a fav of mine)and many other majors have published basic-to-pro how-to's that include all the essentials of sound system design. I think, internetwise, it's a matter of research.

    I learned my first lessons from Electrovoice, about decibels, speaker arrangements, Mic placement, mixing, EQ'ing, in a booklet series I had to buy at a used guitar lot in the 70"s.

    I wish I could recommend a one-book-tells-all, but I don't think it exists. I haven't read them all, though.

    But I would tend towards Yamaha and Rane.

    I'll look some stuff up and get back.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  4. #4
    ElectroVoice did something called the Sound Reinforcement Bible or some such, years back. It's online, google it. Good basic stuff. This was many years before digital, but as far as analog goes it's still current.

  5. #5
    Yea, that's it. Sound Reinforcement Bible. Electrovoice circa 1978.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  6. #6
    And it's free!

    After you digest that, get the Yamaha book. You should have something on hand that you can read through more than once. When you're actually out there working, doing shows, you'll be surprised at the things you find in the book that you didn't notice on your first read.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Guys for initial help, look like yahama book is no longer available.

    I am going to attend training in Nov for TOA, is there any software that can tell me the amplifier and speaker relationships? for example if i use 1000 W amplifier and put 1000 W speak, the utliization calculation or something like that.

    Thanks again for your time.

  8. #8
    There are many facets of professional audio. Toa is heavy into commercial sound like office buildings, schools, etc. You will learn about 70V speaker systems, which are a lot different from live sound reinforcement systems.

    You can find the Yamaha book, used, cheap, on line. You can, you can.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Karl, I google it and found it. Now i am going through it.

    Yes TOA more into offices, Multi Purpose Halls but i need to go through training, My boss wants me into that, I am Computer Network engineer but wants me to go for training. that is why i want to get basic ideas before goes for it.

    Thanks again Guys for your help.

  10. #10
    Quote
    Quote: karl eilers
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    I seem to be first, I assume others will add their favorites.

    Best starter book I know, and less expensive than many: Sound Reinforcement Handbook by Gary Davis and Ralph Jones, second edition. Published by Hal Leonard. Written for Yamaha. I don't know if it's currently in print, but there are always copies on Ebay and Amazon.
    The Yamaha book is the REAL bible for pro sound IMHO. I have had and read through more than 6 or 7 books, and it is the most complete. For the novice-beginner, there is one called the Live sound manual, it is a little more basic, but has good information.

    Sounds like you are looking at more like a distributed (70 Volt) sound system, which is a different beast altogether. It is more likely encountered in A/V (Audio Visual) jobs, which differ from pro sound jobs a little. If you are a computer guy, you are probably going to learn the A/V stuff...

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