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  1. #1
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    Whats the Difference Between DSP or Digital Reverb?

    Hi Guys,

    I am a bit confuse between DSP and digital Reverb? According to study both DSP and Digital Reverb is used to convert A/D and D/C.

    DSP got High,low pass filters with EQ. while Digital Reverb got special filter known as Anti-Aliasing.

    Please help me whether DSP can be a use as Digital Reverb? or we definitalty have to Buy Digital Reverb?

    further more we use DSP between mixing console and Amplifier, what about Digital Reverb, where we can slot this equipment, can we slot it like DSP or is there any special place for it?

    Thanks for your time and looking forward for professional help.

  2. #2
    Hi Mateeq,

    DSP stands for Digital Signal Processing. A digital delay (or reverb) IS a DSP device. In other words it uses DSP to create the effect. Some take an analog signal and apply a digitally derived delay to it. Some take the analog input, convert it to a digital signal with an A/D (analog to digital) converter, apply delay, and mix it back into the analog signal via a D/A (digital to analog) converter. Still others start with a digital input, add the delay, and the output is still digital.

    As to where to use a digital reverb, normally it is added to the mix using an insert point on the console, like an aux bus, so you can control exactly how much of each channel gets reverb in it. More often than not you'll want reverb on some things, like vocals, but not on others, like bass guitar. I do that with all my DSP effects.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  3. #3
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    Thanks for you reply,

    Just want to clarrify this, Aux ports are on mixer, i am using yamaha 124cX, its mean i need to put Digital Reverb on Aux port?

    How many channel (Mics) an Aux port control? sorry i am new i do not know whether this is good question or not. but still asking.


    I can see from diagram that AUX1 from mixer goes to Effector and then comes back to Return L(Mono) and R (Mono) on mixer.

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=mateeq;22187]Thanks for you reply,

    Just want to clarrify this, Aux ports are on mixer, i am using yamaha 124cX, its mean i need to put Digital Reverb on Aux port?

    How many channel (Mics) an Aux port control? sorry i am new i do not know whether this is good question or not. but still asking.


    I can see from diagram that AUX1 from mixer goes to Effector and then comes back to Return L(Mono) and R (Mono) on mixer.

    What is the difference between feedback distroyer and reverb?
    as reverb can be done by using DSP or effector, what about Feedback Distroyer, and where we can slot this equipment? after mixer and before DSP or after mic?

    Thanks for your time.

  5. #5
    If you are refering to Yamaha's GS124cX mixer then we are on the same page, in which case:

    Aux Send to reverb unit input.
    Reverb unit output to Aux Return.

    Now, each channel of the mixer should have an Aux knob, colored blue. These will control how much of the signal from each channel is sent into the Aux bus. Directly under these are buttons labeled Pre. Make sure these are selected (pressed down). Pre is short for pre-fader, and selects the point in the channel the Aux Bus is fed from (pre- or post-fader)

    There is a blue knob labeled Aux in the Effects section of the mixer. This appears to control how much of the signal from the Aux Bus goes to the internal effects. (This makes no sense to me since the white Effects knobs appear to do the same thing.) I would leave this set to 0.

    In the Master section of the mixer here is another (blue?) knob labeled Aux Send which will control how much of the Aux bus signal (the total of all the channels' blue Aux knobs together) goes out to the reverb unit. Another blue knob labeled Aux return will control how much of the processed signal coming back from the reverb unit is mixed back into the Main Output.

    The Feedback Destroyer, when used in that mode (read the manual) will listen for feedback from the speakers and filter it out as it occurs. However, I'm not sure why you would need it, because feedback is rather easy to control in a small system. But if you do need it feed your main outs to it, and then to the amps.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

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