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  1. #1

    Excessive effects rendering time - Premiere Pro

    Hi, folks:

    I am using Premiere Pro CS4 on a single core 2.8ghz P4 with 4GB system memory and 2TB external RAID 0 for video input files. I am running Windoze XP Pro SP2.

    Here's the problem: I have an 8 minute video. Without special effects, rendering is fast and an export to WMV format takes a little over an hour. With about 40 special effects, it is extremely slow and nearly impossible to view the movie. For example, if I use the left arrow to move the current time indicator, it takes about 4 seconds to resolve. An export to WMV format takes 15 hours.

    Now actually, the special effects only take a few minutes of time throughout the timeline. They are spread throughout the segment and each one lasts 5-20 seconds. So most of the time, the video is rendered "as-is" without special effects.

    I activate a special effect like circle by setting opacity to 100, then deactivate the effect by setting opacity to 0. I suspect that PPro continues to process the effect throughout the rest of the timeline even though opacity is set to zero. In other words, I think that PPro does all the math to draw the circle, then layers it and sets transparency to zero so that it is invisible. I would hope that PPro would not draw the circle if transparency is set to 0.

    Questions:
    - Is this the correct way to activate and deactive an effect?
    - Is there a better way?
    - Is there a known problem with the way PPro processes effects?

    I need a new quad core computer or a dual core with Nvidia HD technology. But in the interim, do you have suggestions as to how I can speed up workflow processing?

    Thank you very much,

    Fred

  2. #2
    What is the original file format of the video? What kind of effects are you using?

    In the long run I think you are probably getting as much out of your current system as you can. Lots of effects takes lots of CPU processing power, a quad core would cut your time way down. Still, if you are using a lot of color correction, Shadow/Highlight, Contrast or Brightness, it is going to take a lot of time.

    When effects are processed they have to be processed for every frame, NTSC is 30 frames per second. Lots of processing means lots of changes to each frame, one effect and one frame at a time. 8 minutes is over 14,000 frames are being processed however many times as you have effects.

    You might want to consider adding an effect and then exporting an AVI of the project. Then replace the original with the AVI export and add more effects to that, then export again. It will cut down on some of the rendering time at least. The overall cure is to get a faster CPU. Or find a way to not need all of the effects in post production.
    2 x Dual Core Xeon 3.0, Premiere Elements 1 - 7, Premiere Pro CS3, After Effects CS3, Soundbooth, Heroglyph, Vitascene, EncoreDVD http://muvipix.com

  3. #3
    Quote
    Quote: Chuck Engels
    View Post
    What is the original file format of the video? What kind of effects are you using? ...
    Hi, Chuck:

    Thanks for your response. I am using primarily circle effects to obscure a brand name captured in the video for the client.

    But, please note that each effect only runs for 5-20 seconds. With 40 or so effects, I realize this could cover 3-5 minutes of the video. But I suspect that Adobe is processing each effect for the entire length of the video, not just for the few seconds it is active.

    Think this might be the case?

    Regarding interim exports to AVI files, the overall clock time to render and export would still be the same - I don't think I would save any real time. Also, my understanding is that AVI files are not completely lossless, so image degradation might occur. Correct?

    Thanks,
    Fred

  4. #4
    What is your original format? That can make all the difference in the world.
    If your original format is DV-AVI then it won't have to processing each effect for the entire length of the video, just the parts you change.

    DV-AVI is close enough to uncompressed that it takes more than 4 generations to see any loss of quality.
    2 x Dual Core Xeon 3.0, Premiere Elements 1 - 7, Premiere Pro CS3, After Effects CS3, Soundbooth, Heroglyph, Vitascene, EncoreDVD http://muvipix.com

  5. #5
    Hi, Chuck:

    Well, the good news is that the input format is AVI. That's also bad news because because it means that theoretically PPro is not processing each effect when the effect is disabled (via the transparency setting).

    So I could consolidate effects by exporting, then reimporting the clip. That would speed up on-screen rendering. But it would also take time to render the effects when exporting, so I think it would be a wash as far as total time is concerned.

    I think I should set up a avi test clip with a dozen effects. First, I'll set the effects to cover the entire clip, then I'll export the clip. Then I'll set the effects to cover only a few seconds, then export again and note any time difference. I could also convert the clip to another format and run the test again. That would confirm whether PPro is behaving correctly or not.

    Fred

  6. #6
    Where is the file from? Not all AVI files are the same.
    Premiere likes DV-AVI, not XVID or some other form of AVI.
    2 x Dual Core Xeon 3.0, Premiere Elements 1 - 7, Premiere Pro CS3, After Effects CS3, Soundbooth, Heroglyph, Vitascene, EncoreDVD http://muvipix.com

  7. #7
    Chuck:

    This particular video was imported into PPro from a DVD connected through a ADS Tech converter box (from Video Guys). It makes PPro think it is importing from DV.

    So I think the AVI format is as good as it can be for PPro.

    Again, thanks for your comments.

    Fred

  8. #8
    Is it the Pyro Link or one of the other ADS converters?
    2 x Dual Core Xeon 3.0, Premiere Elements 1 - 7, Premiere Pro CS3, After Effects CS3, Soundbooth, Heroglyph, Vitascene, EncoreDVD http://muvipix.com

  9. #9
    Hi, Chuck:

    It's a Pyro A/V/ Link, part number API-567. What do you think of this box? AV Guys say it is a good box. But I find that when importing through it, it typically downgrades from digital (green light on front) to analog (red light on front). I'm connected via firewire to a card in the PC and am importing to a dedicated RAID 0, two disk configuration.

    Fred

  10. #10
    Hi Fred, I love the Pyro and have used one for the past 4 years or so.
    It is an analog to digital converter, any device connected to it will be analog. Even though a DVD is basically considered digital media the process of displaying video is still analog. The digital light will come on if you are going the other way, transferring digital video from your computer to an external analog device.
    2 x Dual Core Xeon 3.0, Premiere Elements 1 - 7, Premiere Pro CS3, After Effects CS3, Soundbooth, Heroglyph, Vitascene, EncoreDVD http://muvipix.com

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