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  1. #11
    Excellent news.

    Hey, thanks for your time. I'll eventually run the test I mentioned and post results here if PPro is doing anything unexpected.

    By the way, did you author the book listed with your profile?

    Fred

  2. #12
    Ok, I ran a series of tests. They indicate that there probably is not a problem with Premiere Pro CS4, other than the fact that it requires a lot of resources. Discussion on various forums indicate that a dual processor is pretty much required for PPro CS4.

    The details: I ran the tests on a Windows XP Pro Pentium 4 single core processor with 4gb system memory, RAID 0 for the input media. I killed all extraneous tasks before the test.

    The input file was: 480x320 29fps, wmv format, 48 seconds.

    Test 1: imported the file, then exported in wmv format, 320x240, 29fps. Total time to export with Windows Media Encoder: 4:56. (4 minutes, 56 seconds).

    Test 2: same as test 1, except that I added effects stacked on top of each other, for a total time of 1 second of effects. The effects were: unsharp mask, zoom, magnify, slowly moving circle. Total time to export with Windows Media Encoder: 12:55. Test2 time - test1 time = 7:59.

    Test 3: same as test 2, except I stretched the effects to last for 5 seconds. Total time to export with Windows Media Encoder: 14:14. Test3 time - test2 time = 1:19.

    Test 4. same as test 2, except I stretched the effects to last for 10 seconds. Total time to export with Windows Media Encoder: 18:06. Test3 time - test3 time = 3:52. Test3 time - test2 time = 5:11.

    The tests yield the following observations:
    - Windows Media Encoder takes over twice as long to export the segment with 4 stacked effects.
    - Windows Media Encoder takes longer to render effects with a longer time duration. Thus, it appears to be processing effects only for the duration required and not for the entire clip.
    - This appears to be a nonlinear relationship. More benchmark tests could confirm the nonlinear relationship.

    It should be noted that these tests really measure the performance of Windows Media Encoder as opposed to PPro itself. They do not conclusively prove that PPro itself is optimally efficient when processing effects.

  3. #13
    Many long renders can be improved by precomposing properly and then pre-rendering certain effects and layers and bringing them back in as movies


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGVz3HApAng

  4. #14
    Yes, that probably is the case. What do you think is the least lossy interim format for movies?

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