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  1. #1
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    ? about sound absorbing

    Any recommendations on inexpensive do-it-yourself sound absorbing? We are redoing the stage at my church and we want to put something against the flat wall behind the stage to catch some of the sound from amps and such to lessen and/or deaden it. We have echo issues and any ideas would be appreciated. I know these things are best left to pros but that isn't in our non-budget. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Hi

    I used to play in a band and we found nothing better (and cheaper) than glueing egg crates to the wall of our practice venue. We used the tray style ones that hold packs of 30 eggs and they work a treat!!!

    Chris

  3. #3
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    Appreciate the help. Would the foam eggcrate padding do the trick too or not? I will jsut have to get fabric or something to pretty it up. Can't have ugly on the stage!

  4. #4
    The rough paper ones are more absorbent. Make wood frames to go around them and stretch colorful thin fabric over the frames. If you choose the fabric right it will look like you spent a zillion bucks with a stage set designer. Warning: this is going to be really flammable, so you have to be careful with it.

    Carpet is a less flammable option, but the trick is to not mount the carpet flat against a reflective surface - if you do it will only absorb the highest frequencies. Mount the carpet on frames a few inches from the wall to absorb voice-range frequencies; mount it a foot or more from the wall to absorb bass. Choose carpet that does not have a rubber backing, because the sound has to go thru it to be absorbed.

  5. #5
    Stage curtains and duvetyne are most common, and they can be taken down, if needed. Proper stage materials will be flame retardant, but you should keep the candles away from any fabric just to be safe....

  6. #6
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Anybody know if panels of cork would work for deadening echo/reverb.

    My situation is a subject wearing a lav, facing a wall and/or corner (about 12"-18"/30-45cm away). I'm thinking the cork can double up and be used to pin down scripts.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  7. #7
    If it's good, thick, soft cork, it will work. It will also smell. Sniff it before buying, especially if the studio has poor ventilation.

  8. #8
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Yikes! I didn't know there were some corks with an odor. Maybe it wasn't washed well after the wine was gone J/k

    Thanks for the warning Karl - I'll definitely won't buy, sight unseen.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  9. #9
    Hi Guys

    Dunno if you can get them there but we used to be able to get acoustic tiles. They use them in false ceilings and are fibreboard and have various size holes punched in them to help absorb the sound.

    What really works well is spun fibreglass (the kind they use for insulation) usually is a pink colour!!!

    However I found that my eggcrates worked very well and you can buy them from packaging companies new. Yes, you do need the cardboard ones rather than the foam ones, but the foam ones do work and look better!!

    Otherwise a thick curtain works wonders too...even cheap blankets do a great job!!

    Chris

  10. #10
    acoustic ceiling tile is available everywhere, but it doesn't work so well for walls because it is SO easy to damage. If you choose to use it, the same caution applies as any other material: don't glue it right to the wall. It works better if there's several inches behind it.

    Pink fiberglass is one of the very best absorbents - too good in some cases; people near it experience such an unnatural sense of deadness that it's unnerving.

    Heating and ventilating people use fiberglass that's compressed into somewhat-hard 1" thick sheets and surfaced with a material that keeps it from shedding. This stuff is very good, if you can find it. It's usually used to deaden resonating vent duct panels. Mount it a few inches from the wall and cover it with a nice fabric. If it's going to be accidentally bumped into, back it with pegboard or something that's hard but has as much area open as possible.

    You have lots of options. Pick whatever works best in your situation.

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