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  1. #11
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    There is nothing at this point in time that I'm aware of. At least you have a chance to polish your editing skills - if you make a mistake, you won't be fired
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  2. #12
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Ok - that's a bit extreme. Make that.... yelled at!
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  3. #13
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    Re: How does a VCR 'know' when to skip a commercial?

    I think most of you are right - the VCR doesn't do it automatically - you hit a button to skip 30 seconds.

    As for special signals, there ARE special signals. They are filtered at the broadcast end so you don't hear them anymore. But, on some satelite stations from not too long ago, you used to hear a couple of short tone bursts just before the commercial was going to hit. This was not on all, but some ads. This was to trigger the auto ad insert feature used by cable television companies to insert local "spots". Not all paid ads are allowed to be "covered" but local spots. that is why you didn't hear it on all of them. The networks have started to use this method to assist the automation of master control boards in television broadcast stations as well.

    They are not broadcast any longer so VCRs cannot use them to trigger a pause, and there were no tones at the end of the spot time anyway.

    The idea of "fade to black" won't work on many commercials either. There is a set amount of time for that ad to run. Sometimes the commercial is a few frames too long and the broadcasters will generally just cut it off at exactly 30:00. The next one will start while that last frame is still on, so there would be no fade to black on those spots. I found political spots were the worst at going over. Sometimes I had to trim off close to 10 frames to bring it into the allotted time.

    Hope this helps explain some of it.
    Steve

  4. #14

    commercial skip

    Hi! I used to work at a TV station and I can answer this for you.

    Commercials are loaded into a machine called a "cart" - lots of them in one cart - in order of when they are scheduled to play. A station usually has three or more carts. Programs emit a tone at the commercial break. This tone tells the cart machine to start up and play. Commercials are made with a tone at the end of them. This tone is designed to tell the machine playing the show to start back up.

    VCR's with commercial skip were made to pick up on those tones, thus, knowing exactly when the commercials started and stopped.

    Advertisers, who pay big money to the stations for advertising, did not like this. They pressured stations to pressure manufacturers to take away this ability from the consumer - under threat of pulling their advertising. So now we have the "progressive scan" which only allows you to fast forward a minute or so at a time - you have to keep doing it, so you are tied to the machine and stuck watching (even though it's fast) so you don't overrun the show. Thank you advertisers

    As for the decibel level - marketers discovered that people paid more attention to sounds that were suddenly louder, so they started making commercials louder to "wake people up" and get their attention.
    hope this helped

  5. #15
    Quote
    Quote: babs100
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    Hi! I used to work at a TV station and I can answer this for you.

    Commercials are loaded into a machine called a "cart" - lots of them in one cart - in order of when they are scheduled to play. A station usually has three or more carts. Programs emit a tone at the commercial break. This tone tells the cart machine to start up and play. Commercials are made with a tone at the end of them. This tone is designed to tell the machine playing the show to start back up.

    VCR's with commercial skip were made to pick up on those tones, thus, knowing exactly when the commercials started and stopped.

    Advertisers, who pay big money to the stations for advertising, did not like this. They pressured stations to pressure manufacturers to take away this ability from the consumer - under threat of pulling their advertising. So now we have the "progressive scan" which only allows you to fast forward a minute or so at a time - you have to keep doing it, so you are tied to the machine and stuck watching (even though it's fast) so you don't overrun the show. Thank you advertisers

    As for the decibel level - marketers discovered that people paid more attention to sounds that were suddenly louder, so they started making commercials louder to "wake people up" and get their attention.
    hope this helped


    Wow it has been a while since you have been in TV right. there has not been carts in about 10 years.
    Manoni Productions
    Pass me another beer...You are still ugly!

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