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  1. #1
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    Newbie - shooting a product installation video

    I am new to videography and new to this forum. My experience is in making short videos of events for my church, using a simple Sony Handycam and Magix Movie Edit Pro 15....which developed into a passion! I've gained one client who saw one of my videos and wanted a video for his website. Another guy saw one of my videos and now wants me to produce an installation video for an automotive aftermarket product that is about to go nationwide. GULP! I definitely see this as a huge opportunity to liftoff my videography business and to build my portfolio. Obviously I can't go in there with a little Handycam and some softboxes and not expect to get laughed out of the room...SO...need a little advice here.

    They are looking for a product installation video. Basically filming a man installing the product in a car, with a voice over, explaining the steps of the install.

    I just acquired Sony Vegas 6 and am learning how to use it. I am looking into the Canon GL2 possibly to film it with a Bogen 305 tripod. I have a green screen if necessary as well as 3 Vu-Pro softboxes. Not knowing a thing about audio, I'm not sure how to record a voice-over.

    If anyone could offer some advice, I would greatfully appreciate it! Particularly in the area of equipment (a camera less than $1300 or so) as well as how to record a voice-over. Any other input is welcome of course!

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Hi Dan

    An installation video would be a pretty simple project to do. What I would firstly do is film each installation step and then stop after each step and film closeups of essentials bits of the step so you have a continuous record of the particular step and then you can also add the closeups to make things clearer for the user as overlays (In Vegas just add them where necessary on a higher track) It would probably pay you to talk on camera (or get the installer to say what he is doing) so you have a temporary live narration to help you compile a narration. Once in Vegas you can play back the track and then write yourself a real voiceover . You can record this directly on your computer using a standard or USB mic. Once you have the narration recorded then simply delete the "live" audio and replace with your own narration.

    Chris

  3. #3
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    Thanks Chris...brilliant advice!!

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    You might also like to consider a professional voiceover if budget allows. There's something different about a trained professional voiceover artist - it's hard to quantify but it definitely makes a difference having a pro do the job. IMO it's a relatively cheap way to make a relatively dramatic improvement.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  5. #5
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    Dave, I agree about the voiceover. How exactly does that work? And what can I expect to pay (ballpark)? Thanks!

  6. #6
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    To be honest I'm not sure what the rates are in the US. Here in New Zealand I might expect to pay a few hundred dollars for a 5-10 minute voiceover. It varies a lot depending on the class of the voiceover talent, the type of production (they charge more for bigger releases/audiences), and whether it's one-off job (you get better deals with recurring work). You could try joining some sites like www.voices.com and see what you can find out there. These sites usually have a showcase of talent and previews of their voices.

    Once you've found someone, the general process is to email them a script and any relevant notes about how you want it to sound, pronunciation of unusual words, etc. They record it and send you the audio file.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  7. #7
    Hi Dan

    I have used a guy is Tasmania (ex radio jock) who is excellent and he charges me AUS$1.00 per linear second. However it's also worth seeing where the instruction video will be marketed and get a voice to suit the region. It's no good having a posh British Accent if the video will be mainly marketed in the USA!!!

    What I have often done when on a budget is see if there are any "Radio Announcer Training Schools" near you...they have students who are happy to do a pro job for a reduced fee.

    Chris

  8. #8
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    Those are some great ideas..thank you!

  9. #9
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: ChrisHarding
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    It's no good having a posh British Accent if the video will be mainly marketed in the USA!!!
    There's a certain funny under lying truth, yet that certain tone, that lilt, that smile you can't see but can imagine, can make such a difference (subjectively). Actually, some of the infomercials I've seen with non-Americans, has given me a bit more entertainment.

    Quote
    Quote: ChrisHarding
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    What I have often done when on a budget is see if there are any "Radio Announcer Training Schools" near you...they have students who are happy to do a pro job for a reduced fee.
    This is such a great idea because you can barter for this!
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

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