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Thread: The Right Mix

  1. #1
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    The Right Mix

    Hey .

    Im a music programmer and i use a lot of vst's , most of the time .

    So , can some one help me out on simple tips to get the right mix which sounds decent enough for myself to hear .

    And also , i want to know whether i should convert my midi tracks to mono or stereo to mix , and which instruments need to be recorded on mono and which on stereo .

    Thanks .

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    I'll have a go at the mono vs stereo question. Basically you need to determine whether there's anything to spread across two channels for a stereo effect - if not then mono is appropriate. For example, a saxophone is normally recorded in mono because it's not a stereo instrument. On the other hand a drum kit works very well in stereo with individual drums panned left to right.

    There are exceptions; e.g. if you want to record a bit of room ambience with the saxophone, stereo recording might be nice. A piano could be recorded either mono or stereo - depending on the music you could have a very subtle spread or a more obvious one.

    I don't think there are any hard and fast rules about this, it's probably a case of experimenting and seeing what works for you.

    Remember that there's also the option of adding stereo effects afterwards. Guitars are often recorded "dry" in mono with stereo effects added later (reverb, flange, etc).
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
    The most important recording tip I know is to listen to the finished result on a bunch of different speakers. It's amazing how a certain speaker will show you something off balance or tonally screwed even though it sounds right on another speaker.

    This is valuable even if you always intend to use the same set of speakers. Pardon the digression, but somebody whose name I can't remember once said something like, "The purpose of international travel is to be able to return to your own country and see it for the first time."

    Likewise, after you've listened to familiar material on other speakers, you will hear your own speakers as if for the first time, and the knowledge will improve your mixes.

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