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  1. #11
    Bob Boland
    Guest

    Thanks

    Thanks for your help. I see that my music stores have adaptors and in-line transformers that take XLR to TRS or 1/4 inch.

  2. #12
    yes,yes,yes, but everyone is missing the point. The electronic art of noise cancellation is beyond tip-ring-sleave and impeadence-matching transformers (baluns, radioshack). It happens at the input and output of each piece of equipment and is dependant upon each manufacturer. I am only a part timer here, if that, and this is a large subject, one that has made and broken many studios. The theory is only the start. the experiments are the fun, the results are the blessing. Impedence is a very kind animal if you know how to treat it. Knowledge of basic electonics, especially surrounding the radio communications field, is essentual because the same theories apply. The fact is that all inputs want to be infinite ohms and all outputs want to be zero ohms in a perfect world, with no connecting cables, or air, and there would be no noise. but we don't have perfection, we have cables and connectors, some made in (political correction inserted here), so we have laws of physics to play with. Balancing happens in the equipment, and baluns (which stands for BALANCE-UNBALANCE) will only make sure that the signal gets in there, complete with all the noise, at a level you are supposed to be able to work with. The 2 most essential ohms values to deal with in audio are 600 ohms (low impedence, tip-ring-sleeve) and 10,000 ohms (hi impedence, tip-sleave). The 600 ohm system was developed by Bell Labs when telephones came out and is the standard, because ,generally speaking, there is a method of of terminallizing that cancels almost all noise inducted into the cable by nature and man-made stuff alike. The 10,000 ohm system was developed by NASA, before it was NASA, as the consumer version of whatever they were trying to sell, and has no noise-limiting capability whatsoever. Matching the two together with a balun will NOT eliminate any noise, but only make sure it gets through, with the audio, at a level the equipment can deal with. There is a cool site at Rane.com that gets into the wiring part, but it is the theory part that I find most people need to study before they can really get a grip on this. I also know that mediacollege has some really good diagrams worth printing out and taping to the wall.
    Last edited by penniesfromheaven; 23rd May 2006 at 00:47.
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  3. #13
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: penniesfromheaven
    yes,yes,yes, but everyone is missing the point. The electronic art of noise cancellation is beyond....

    ...has some really good diagrams worth printing out and taping to the wall.
    Spoken like a true veteran...
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  4. #14
    Thanks. I believe in homework, now that I know what it's for. I had a serious problem with it when I was little.
    "The first rule of engineering is that you never have too much power. The second is that everything else is a fix".
    'I think my intimate relationship with electronics started as a child when I was playing with a screwdriver and a wall plug, Doc, and...'

  5. #15
    qwerty
    Guest

    Balanced and Unbalanced Forces

    What is a Balance/Unbalanced Force

  6. #16

    matcing transormers as distinguished from DI

    Dale G,
    Something to bear in mind is that the function of the matching transformer is to transform from hi impedance (Hi-Z) to low impedance (Lo-Z) or vice-versa. It's the DI box's job to effectively convert unbalanced signals to balanced signals and provide dB cut and ground lift options.

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