Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Canon XM2 or any other suggestions?

    Hi there.. this is my first post... As a beginner in videography, Im planning to buy Canon XM2 camcorder to practice and gain experience and eventually be a wedding videographer someday.. Are there any videocameras that are better within the same price level of canon xm2?


    Regards to everyone..

    Marc

  2. #2
    Camera Operator/Producer lake54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    384
    Refreshing my memory for the price of an XM2, I did an extremely brief search which returned prices around the 2000 mark - obviously there'll be places a lot cheaper, and equally there'll be places more expensive, so it's not a direct comparison.

    My camera is a Sony HD1000, the price is essentially 1000 wherever you look. It is very entry-level, so doesn't have a massive amount of features, but it's made specifically in mind for the new freelance videographer. I'm building up my collection of accessories etc, and although I've gone down a different route, I'd make sure you get a light as early on as you can (this goes for most CMOS-chip cameras - the XM2 is a CCD-based camera, so in general, performs better in low-light).

    If you want more info on the Sony HD1000 feel free to ask, I've got a few minutes of footage on YouTube (private as it's not released yet) which I can let you look at if you want to see the quality (comprises sports coverage, outside shoulder interviews, inside tripod interviews with lighting, basically everything you could want).

    I know someone who I'm pretty sure has an XM2, I'll ask him what he thinks, although he hasn't used my camera directly, he's seen the results of it etc.

    Also, bear in mind that whilst you may get a camera that's 1000 or 2000, but that isn't the end - as I mentioned a minute ago, there's accessories to go with it all - bag(s), light(s), battery(ies), tapes/memory cards, tripod, monitor, plethora of audio equipment - it all costs a lot!

    James

  3. #3
    Camera Operator/Producer lake54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    384
    Just to add, this is what I got back from my friend:

    The quality is a pretty decent piece of kit, it's like a smaller more portable XM1. If you're looking for a camera that is not HD then I would recommend it. I think it's like a middle point between amateur filming and higher budget broadcast productions. One criticism is that any handheld shooting is very shaky no matter who is holding it, this is due to the small size of the camera. A good point would be the focus ring which is one of the better ones I have used. Another criticism is that the image is quite grainy in low light and never ever ever use the microphone that is part of the camera, use a separate mic instead
    So, basically he's saying it's a good camera, but you'll need a tripod, light, and new mic. As a comparison to the HD1000, I'd say you only needed a light, the stability off of your shoulder is very good, assuming you've used a shoulder-mounted camera before, and the quality of the mic is also excellent in my opinion, although it's not connected through XLR, just a standard 3.5mm jack.

    James

  4. #4
    You also need to factor in not only an on-camera light but also standalone lighting for the speeches as well as at least 2 wireless lav mics (normally one for the groom and one for the readings. Doing weddings with just a single camera is also touch and a bit dicey!! With weddings you will need two of everything..if something goes wrong with gear on the day you cannot reshoot it ... if someone suddenly stands in front of your only camera you must have the ability to use footage shot at the same time from your second camera!! All my weddings are two camera shoots, especially the ceremony, bridal entrance and speeches.

    Chris

  5. #5
    Thank you guys for the reply... But im now looking at the Sony FX7.. I've read some reviews about XM2 and FX7. Well, others say the XM2 is better, but what caught my attention is what James said in his reply.. about the High Definiton thing.. The FX7 is HD and the XM2 is not... and aside from that.. the FX7 can record videos both in SDCard and tape, but the XM2 only records still photos in SDcard and videos in tape. But the XM2 perfoms better in low light than the FX7 and FX7 don't have an XLR input (is there a work around for this?).... anyway, what im really looking is a camcorder that is not very professional (because im still learning videography), but at the same time, can work great in wedding videography, and a not so big in size camcorder. Can you please help me here?

    Thank you very much James and Chris for your replies. I really appreciate it. And im learning from you guys. Thank you.

  6. #6
    Camera Operator/Producer lake54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    384
    Hi marc,

    There are plenty of workarounds for the lack of XLR. I don't have a need for XLR right now, but if I did, I would probably take a look at a small converter box - there's a brand/manufacturer that everyone recommends but it's slipped out of my head - Chris will remember it I'm sure! Basically you can use it to convert 1 (or more on some models of the box) into a standard 3.5mm connection. Only disadvantage is that you get all the audio mixed into one, so you can't really separate it as easily.

    A 'professional' way is to get a dedicated audio recorder, but they're expensive and can be bulky depending on what you get (think a TV soundman and you'd be getting there!).

    Wireless lavalier mics (the small ones you see on TV, clipped onto jackets etc) are ideal for weddings - hardly noticeable, last a long time on charged batteries, and the quality is usually good. However, the connections are usually XLR...

    In terms of the lighting, I'd say go for the FX7 and get a light to back it up with - even with the XM2 you'd be in some situations where you'd be needing a light anyway. As a point of interest too, the HD1000 is often said to be a repackaged FX7, so in terms of quality, the FX7 will be better (HD etc).

    I think overall, go for the FX7. If it fits your budget, get that, a light, a wireless lav mic (or 2, depending on the budget), and as much other kit as you can!!!

    Anything else let us know!

    James

  7. #7
    Hi James
    The XLR adapters are made by BeachTek...usually around the $200 - $300 mark and they can fit under your camera. The big advantage is that they have phantom power and also the choice of line and mic levels. They do split the audio actually...into left and right using your standard 3.5mm jack. I'm not sure if they have mic attenuation like my HMC's but that's a huge help when you are at a wedding and the DJ is pumping out 120db of music!!! Most wireless packs are actually still 3.5mm jack (I had to convert mine to XLR) My Azden's have a battery life of around 6 hours which is plenty for a wedding.

    The essential difference on an FX7 will be the fact that it's a 3 chip camera as opposed to the HD1000 single chip so your low light will be a bit better. It's a very popular wedding camera and does a great job!!

    Chris

  8. #8
    Camera Operator/Producer lake54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    384
    Told you Chris would remember it! http://www.beachtek.com/

    Mic Attenuation - that is now my favourite phrase ever. Just looked up it's meaning! I've been looking for something to do that since... I started filming! (which admittedly isn't that long, but still). Wow. Now I need to find out if it's on my camera, because I don't remember seeing it...

    Regarding the audio splitting, I meant as in 'tracks', so you'd have one or two speech tracks, the on-camera 'track', and any other mics on separate tracks.

    I thought it was just the cheapest that had 3.5mm jacks on, interesting. Makes life a bit easier I guess!

    James

  9. #9
    Hi James

    My older cams never had attenuation so yours probably hasn't either..it's normally only included on units with XLR !! Why it's useful is that you can keep your mic "hot" and then attenuate quickly on the camera. If you take the Rode VideoMic which is about the only mic that I can use in the noisy environment at events. The mic itself has internal dip switches so you can leave the output at either 0db, -10db and -20db.... I leave mine at 0db so it's pretty sensitive when I do one on one guest interviews at weddings...if I left it like that when the DJ cranks up the music, the audio simply blows out!! so instead of having to open the mic case and fiddle around with setting switches, I can simply flip the -20db switch on that XLR channel so the mic is -20db less sensitive!!! Even XLR channel mics only still have the two channels that 3.5mm mics have..it just makes it easier to feed one audio source to the left and one to the right.

    Chris

  10. #10
    Nate Dawg ndthompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Steamboat Springs Colorado
    Posts
    2
    Chris, you mentioned a Beach Tek XLR adapter, and I must say they do the job well. We just recently switched our XLR adapters from Beach Tek to one called Juiced Link, a great phantom power source. What we've discovered is a lot less line noise and just cleaner audio all together. It might be something to look into.
    Best of luck~

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube