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  1. #1
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    Equipment for video interviews

    I am a beginner and I want to purchase gear to do studio interviews. I will be a one man operation as well as the inteviewer in the video.
    I got a few questions. Can a set boom mic be used for 2 people without needing to move it as each person speaks? Or would it be better to use 2 lable mics with a mixer?
    I was thinking of Audio-technica 835b Shotgun Condenser Microphone as my budjet is low..
    Is it better to use a digital recorder rather than to use sount to the video camera?
    Any other tips would be helpful for a one man operation.

  2. #2
    I would suggest using two lavaliere mics and run straight into the two audio channels of the camera. Get a camera with professional XLR inputs, and mics with XLR connections. Buy b-stock (refurbished) or used gear if possible to stretch your budget and get into the price range of better equipment.

    What is your budget?

  3. #3
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    Hi Allan,
    My budjet is about $200 to $400 for the mics.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Quote: maurice
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    Can a set boom mic be used for 2 people without needing to move it as each person speaks? Or would it be better to use 2 lable mics with a mixer?
    I was thinking of Audio-technica 835b Shotgun Condenser Microphone as my budjet is low..
    Is it better to use a digital recorder rather than to use sount to the video camera?
    Any other tips would be helpful for a one man operation.
    A boom mic is normally uni-directional and is used with a dedicated Audio/Boom operator who must re-direct the mic to the sound source. Lav's are the better alternative since it's a one man operation. Otherwise, wired hand-held if you are the interviewer and you have an interviewee.

    TIP: Use a monitor or other display to set-up your shot but turn it away from the interviewee when shooting because it will distract them to look at themselves rather than look at the camera.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

  6. #6
    To move beyond the built-in microphone on your camera, you have a wide range of options. There is probably more variety in form, capability, and price among microphones than any other camera accessory. There are small clip-on or "lav" mics for an interview subject, stereo mics for ambience, directional "shotgun" mics for dialog when the mic must not be seen, large "studio" mics for voice-over and musical instruments, and so on. The higher-priced models tend to have lower intrinsic noise, to enable you to capture fainter sounds without objectionable hiss. Most "consumer" mics use a 1/8" stereo or mono miniplug which plugs directly into the TRV900 mic jack next to the lens. Professional mics use an XLR plug, meaning you need an XLR adaptor box or adaptor cable to connect them to the TRV900.

    If you use more than one or two microphones, or you want to boost levels to reduce the effect of the TRV900's mic preamp noise, you need a mixer. Most mixers have a line-level output, but you need to generate mic-level output for the TRV900. This can be done either with an outboard 30 or 40 dB attenuator, or simply the headphone output of the mixer turned almost all the way down (this latter approach may be of lower quality, depending on your mixer).

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