Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37
  1. #1

    Panasonic ag dvc 20p

    Hi Group:
    I'm, new and have a question. Just purchased the agdvc20p and been reading the manual about night shot. My question is if you leave the camera in manual mode and use a light is it possible to get almost the same results that you get at daytime. A lot of my work in done at night and just switched from stills to provideo is a challange.

  2. #2
    Hi there MVN, you will get a lower end result in the nights unless you have daylight rated lightings... and that is not portable stuff... also it's likely you'll just have one light (? I presume, and on board your camera?) and so you might be getting flat lighting... quick answer... perhaps you can describe the kind of work you do so we can think along and further with you.

    Cheers!
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  3. #3
    Hi MVN

    I have two of the PAL versions of the DVC20 and they are BRILLIANT!!

    First of all DO NOT USE NIGHTSHOT!!! It is a terrible feature on all Panny cameras!!

    The DVC only uses 370K effective pixels on it's chips compared to most cams that tend to use a lot more. Because of this your pixel spacing on the chip is way bigger than a similar camera so your light sensitivity is a LOT better!!

    In low light switch to manual and the low light feature comes into effect. If you scroll thru shutter speed (it will be set to 1/60th in dark scenes) then allow the camera to select the manual iris and gain on it's own!!!
    You can also increase gain if needed but you will find that it's one of the few cameras that can shoot with a fully open iris PLUS 12db of gain and have NO video noise!!!

    I use mine for weddings in low light dingy churches and it out performs my fancy GS500 by miles!!!! (In fact I sold the GS500 and bought a 2nd cam!!)

    If you need any other tips just ask

    Chris

  4. #4

    Panasonic agdvc20

    Hi gang,
    Thanks for answering me . I string for one the tv stations here in Alabama.
    I have put the camera in manual mode at night and I have a 20 watt on camera video light with a battery pack.
    I set it at 60 and I think 12db open am I doing something wrong?
    Don't get me wrong I love the camera and have a couple stories aired and they were shot daylight. That's not the problem, the problem is night time shooting .
    Any help is apperciated.

  5. #5
    Hi

    In manual mode the camera will still set the iris and gain automatically BUT it kicks into low light mode as well. You should get a pretty good image unless you are in a cemetry at midnight!!!

    This video/review is from my friend Keith who shoots for a news crew in Taiwan... take a look at his footage without any light on the camera!!!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXaP-zsxkFs

    The Japanese PAL units are DVCAM but they still have the same chips and electronics.

    Here's another at a night market for you to compare!!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvsKYzBZWGA


    Just bear in mind that all cams need SOME light and a camera mounted light is usually only good enough for very close shots!!

    Chris

  6. #6

    Panasonic agdvc20

    Thanks for the answers will have to give it a try. Never gave it much thought as to the iris...shame on me.

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    dhaka
    Posts
    3

    Just purchased

    Just purchased the agdvc20p and been reading the manual about night shot. My question is if you leave the camera in manual mode and use a light is it possible to get almost the same results that you get at daytime. A lot of my work in done at night

  8. #8
    Hi Sohel1

    Night shot mode is really awful with any Panasonic camera.. they drop the frame rate to allow the CCD chips to charge for longer ...the exposure result is good BUT only for shots with NO movement!! Any movement in nightshot mode gives you a "strobe" effect.
    Unless you are just filming a closeup of a single person, an on camera light is a waste of time. They are great for ENG shots but the light falloff makes wideshots look bad.
    When I shoot weddings where I can setup lights I use one or two CFL softboxes with a DIY light head inside each using 9 x 5000K CFL lamps and that gives a softer light over a big area....however I still use the cams on manual!!!

    Chris

  9. #9
    Always expect noise on your night shots if you do it without lights as you will need to bring up your gain to compensate.

    Perhaps we have to wait for DSLR technology (currently some higher end models are able to shoot under low light without flash and the least noise. Very good images) to be infused into videography, or the other way round... one of them is already doing it.

    http://gizmodo.com/5048028/red-confi...n-than-red-one
    There's no bad camera, just a bad user
    Loong . Singapore

  10. #10
    Hi Nagar

    Camcorders are much like humans.. we expect both to be able to see in the dark!! I think that the rule has always been use lot's of light!! TV studios don't have thousands of kilowatts of overhead lighting just for show!!!

    I was just pointing out that event cameras tend to have a lower resolution but better spaced pixels on their chips for lower noise in low light. If you look at the end of the night markets video that I posted a link to, the video noise is pretty low considering it was shot on a cam with only 1/6th " chips. I compared my GS500 (with 1.47" chips) and the DVC20 with 1/6" chips in similar low light and the GS500 has better resolution but much more noise.

    However, more light is better !!! However a 4:3 footprint on the CCD (as in the DVC20) needs less pixels to achieve SD resolution than a 16:9 footprint in the GS500. I suspect that the chip in an HD camera would suffer even more as it needs not only a 16:9 footprint but also a much better resolution so to have similar low light performance the HD cam needs to have really big sensors!!

    Chris

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Subscribe to us on YouTube